Morai-Logistics-Blog-Hiring-Client-Success-Specialist

Morai Logistics is currently looking for a full-time Client Success Specialist to join our team in Mississauga, ON.

View the job posting on LinkedIn by clicking here!

What does that even mean?

Logistics can be messy, as a client success specialist, your goal is to deliver success within the chaos. On a day-to-day basis, you will be primarily responsible for coordination of the movement of goods from point A to point B (origin to destination). That means, though isn’t necessarily limited to, reserving and booking container equipment from various transportation providers (rail, truck, etc.), coordinating with drayage carriers (and knowing what drayage means!), and electronic tracking (we work with Triton) and tracing, billing, etc.

Our Core Values

  • Integrity and Honesty
  • Respect
  • Empowerment
  • Client Success
  • Community

The top candidates for this position are born multi-taskers and are experts at analyzing many different situations. They are ideally bilingual (Spanish preferred) with a knack for being customer/client-oriented. They’re also a great team player and know the difference between casual and professional writing and when to use each!

What Your Main Responsibilities Would Be

  • Acting customer support and administrative representative for a set of clients
  • Monitors clients’ equipment usage, costs, containers, etc.
  • Prepares and analyzes reports on factors affecting the supply chain process (outstanding equipment charges, yard checks, etc.)
  • Investigate and solve issues regarding any transportation delays
  • Provides basic consultation to help clients find cost saving initiatives

Prerequisites for this Position

  • Post-secondary education preferred
  • Minimum 3 years’ experience in the logistics industry
  • Experience in truckload, LTL, and intermodal
  • Strong analytical and priority management skills
  • Ability to work under pressure and in a constantly evolving and changing environment
  • Team player and a good communicator

Additional Desired Traits

  • Bilingual (Ideally fluent in Spanish)
  • Excel and Word experts
  • Computer literacy in general
  • Interpersonal, conflict resolution and negotiating skills
  • Problem solving and decision making skills
  • Organizational, planning, multi-tasking skills
  • Time management skills; ability to assign tasks, set priorities and resolve related conflicts
  • Forecasting, scheduling and tracking skills

Don’t hesitate to shoot us an e-mail if you’re interested in being part of the Morai Logistics team. Please send an e-mail to apply@morailogistics.com with the job position (Client Success Specialist – Intermodal Position) as part of the subject line!

Logistics trades professionals (i.e. truck drivers, machine operators, etc.): This probably isn’t the job for you, but maybe you know someone who would be the perfect fit! Send them this link and we’ll take it from there! Thanks!

It is no surprise that many people in the logistics industry have labeled it a “Gentleman’s Club.” As outlined in the Morai Logistics Infographic focusing on women in the logistics industry, compared to other industries women still have some room to catch up at all levels in the logistics and supply chain industry.

For example, 35% of logistics graduates are women. Compared to other business graduates in general (of which there are about 45% female graduates), the logistics industry has the highest percentage of male graduates in the industry. Within the professional sphere, women take up less than 20% of company management position despite two-thirds of professionals believing that women offer a different style of management that is viewed as an advantage for companies.

Eye for Transport’ Lean-In Moment: Women in Logistics

Eye for Transport, or EFT, is a business intelligence and C-level networking initiative for the transport, logistics and supply chain industry. It is an organization that specializes in connecting senior industry executives with their industry peers, and with the crucial information they need to excel in their work. They have an annual Third-Party Logistics (3PL) Summit that the President of Morai Logistics was invited to. Kelli Saunders sat on a panel along with 5 other C-level women in the logistics and supply chain industry to discuss their path that got them to where they are today.

Kelli Saunders, President of Morai Logistics, speaking on her journey to becoming President
Kelli Saunders, President of Morai Logistics, speaking on her journey to becoming President
 
 
The efforts that Eye for Transport has taken in showing initiative to create an awareness about the gender gap for executives in the logistics and supply chain industry is commendable. The women in the Lean In series were both inspiring and an example of how women can be a readily able pool of candidates for all levels of position across the entire logistics and supply chain industry. They are great examples of why we should continue our efforts to introduce the notion that logistics is not just a “Gentleman’s Club.”

To see Eye for Transport’s full breakdown of the Lean In Moment on women in logistics, click here: Part 1, Part 2.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news!

Source: WEConnect Canada
Source: WEConnect Canada

This past week, a few members from the Morai Logistics team proudly attended the 5th annual Opening Doors National Conference in Toronto. Hosted by WEConnect Canada, I attended as an observant in support of Morai Logistics where I got to hear the president of the company, Kelli Saunders, during the WBE (Women’s Business Enterprise) Success Stories session. For this week’s post I will be guest blogging on my experience and to give our readers an inside look into WEConnect Canada’s annual conference as well as some takeaways from the WBE Success Stories session.

WEConnect Canada is an organization that certifies majority owned women’s business and facilitates opportunities for those businesses to meet buyers and get access to bids for corporate contacts as part of supplier diversity programs. Their mission is to:

…[advance] the success of certified women business enterprises and corporate members to drive economic growth and prosperity through supplier diversity.

First Impressions

As I walked into the Hyatt Regency in Toronto to check into the conference, I already saw members in the lobby openly conversing. I went up the escalator to where the actual conference was taking place and noticed an overwhelming feeling of openness and support. Everyone I ran into at the conference was both welcoming and friendly, regardless of whether or not they were attendees, speakers, or organizers of the event.

But I also noticed a sense of empowerment; there was a sense of camaraderie not usually present in networking conferences I’ve been to in the past. As I entered the conference hall I saw Kelli Saunders, the president of Morai Logistics sit down at the front of the room along with Marty Britton of Britton Management Profiles and Marla Kott of Imprint Plus. I picked a seat near the front and listened to them talk. My takeaway is as follows…

Diversity Supplier: More Than Being the Sprinkles to the Cupcake

Kelli Saunders WEConnect Opening Doors Conference
Kelli Saunders on the Importance of Supplier Diversity

All three of the women offered some sage advice both for people who have already established and successful businesses as well as for those who are just starting out their entrepreneurial pursuit. The experiences that these women have shared were not only valuable, but also eye-opening to those who have been wondering about how businesses can take off and the importance of a good network.

Mary Britton spoke of the importance of knowing how to work in your business as opposed to working on your busines. As someone who’d seen her company take off and really grow, Mary had to learn how to trust her team and to allow herself to focus on the expansion of her business. She also made a really important point keeping a company lean and not to fear outsourcing. Marla Kott on the other hand, spoke of learning a company’s ecosystem if you ever intend to work together with them. This can make streamlining and cooperation between two companies run more smoothly.

Kelli Saunders spoke of the importance of networking; making connections is the way to get your foot in the door for future clientele. She also emphasized the importance of mentorship and joining organizations like WEConnect so that you can get that foot in the door.

But the most important point that all three speakers bestowed upon the audience that day was the fact that as a business owner, you have to be aware of the tools that are present to you. One of the most important tools for women-owned businesses is certification of supplier diversity. Morai Logistics is part of WEConnect as a certified Women’s Business Enterprise (WBE). This is important as this certification is the only Canadian certification of women-owned businesses and critical to maintaining supplier diversity for companies – something that can be appealing for companies in the logistics and supply chain industry who want to actively promote supplier diversity in their network of partners and clients.

All three women that spoke noted the importance of WEConnect’s WBE certification as something that greatly facilitated their business growth. But the important thing to note is that a certification should not be solely relied upon. As Kelli Saunders, put it:

In the cupcake that is your business, where the cupcake and the frosting are your performance and your team, having a diversity supplier certification is just the sprinkles. You still need to have an excellent cupcake that should stand out more than anything else, the sprinkles are just the bonus that entices the buyer from making that final decision between your cupcake and someone else’s.

Thanks for reading my guest blog post! If you are interested in how Morai Logistics can take the chaos out of your supply chain, check out their services section! If you want to stay updated on their content, why check out the rest of their blog or follow them on Twitter at @MoraiLogistics!

Women in TransportationTwo days ago, a couple of people from the Morai Logistics team attended the Toronto Transportation Club’s (TTC) Lunch and Learn. The theme for this event was on Women in Transportation. I have decided to guest blog this week in order to talk about the overall experience and the takeaways from the keynote speakers which, by the way, were excellent.

My very first impression when walking into this Lunch and Learn was, “Wow! There are a LOT of women in the transportation industry in Toronto!” which was both surprising and refreshing to see. My overall impression of the logistics industry is that it is primarily male. Now, I’ve been to previous TTC events and I have noticed that the majority of the people you see are men. It was nice to see the contrast from previous events I’ve attended to what I saw that day.

The second thing that I noticed was the sense of camaraderie and empowerment in the atmosphere, there was a strong sense of unity – but in such a way that it also felt inclusive. It felt good to know that the Lunch and Learn successfully sold out their tickets to an event that provided a sense of openness and acceptance, especially considering I was one of the few males attending the event!

Killer Swag
Killer Swag

Apart from the great food and the killer swag (which, for obvious reasons went to my mother!), the best part of this entire experience was the fact that I was able to hear from three great female leaders in the transportation industry, including Morai Logistics’ very own Kelli Saunders. For this blog post I would like to feature the takeaway points from these stellar keynotes from inspiring women.

Jacquie Meyers on Balancing Work-Life Balance

Jacquie Meyers took over the family business when she was just 27 years old. As the President of Meyers Transportation Services (MTS), she has shown true leadership and devotion to the logistics industry. In her years of experience as a female leader in transportation, her keynote speech imparts wisdom on the biggest challenge she has had: maintaining a work-life balance. Her biggest take-away was to create a list of priorities that are must-dos; start with a list of things that you definitely have to commit to, and a list of things that are not as highly prioritized. As time passes, you will get better and better at managing your commitments so that you can comfortably achieve a better work-life balance as a woman in management.

Fiona Murray on Asserting Your Achievements and Looking Out for Each Other

Fiona Murray is the Vice President of Corporate Marketing at CN, her speech gave a great piece of insight on women’s rise to the top. She noted, with what I noticed had a majority of heads nodding in the audience, that women are very willing and ready to tackle the challenged of climbing but seldom express their interest or take credit for their achievements. She notes that people in management are not going to be aware of your desire to climb the corporate ladder if you do not express the interest to your managers and bosses. This, combined with the fact that women are noticeably less likely to take credit for their achievements in the office are two critical factors that can stifle your career progress as a woman. She finishes her keynote with a final piece of advice: women are still a minority in management, it is important that they look out for each other in the work place.

Kelli Saunders on Owning Your Identity and Finding a Mentor

Kelli Saunders TTC Lunch and Learn Women in TransportationKelli Saunders is the President of Morai Logistics and has had over 27 years in the logistics industry, as well as an honored member of the TTC (being a former president of the club in 2010). As someone who has been an industry and thought leader in the logistics and supply chain industry, she offered some great insight into her rise to the top. Her first piece of advice to women everywhere is to own your status as a female in the corporate world. Dressing the part is very important; she notes how sometimes dressing like a man might not always be the best strategy for women. It is both unique and different to see a woman in management especially in the world of transportation, you should be proud of your status as female and show your personality while maintaining your professionalism. She also asserts the importance of finding a mentor. Someone to look up to for inspiration, they don’t even have to be someone you personally know. A role model gives you that extra bit of motivation to nudge you into the right direction of a successful career.

As a male attendee, I found the event welcoming and I noticed that the advice was well received by everyone, including the men in the audience. The speakers were passionate and expressed genuine interest in the success of everyone in that room and I hope that all women reading this today can take the advice from the amazing keynote speakers and use it to forward their careers.

If you’re interested in finding out more about the Toronto Transportation Club and what they do, don’t hesitate to visit their site! If you’re interested in what Morai Logistics does in the world of transportation, visit their services page and see how they can take the chaos out of your supply chain. If you like the Morai Logistics blog, please feel free to subscribe to their feed or check them out on Twitter! Cheers!

Hey everyone! Thanks for checking out our blog page, we’re really eager to bring you the latest news in the logistics world as well as some insight into how to make smart decisions when looking at how your business should tackle its transportation needs.

We love logistics, and we feel that many people outside of the logistics community have absolutely no idea what we actually do! Whenever I’m at a cocktail party, introductions always have the follow-up question of what one does and for me the conversation always goes something like this:

Stranger: “Hi, I’m Matt. It’s a pleasure to meet you.”
Me: “I’m Kelli, likewise.”
Matt: “So, Kelli, what do you do?”
Me: “Well, I’m actually in logistics!”
Matt: “… are you a trucker?”

Our goal is to bring you some insight into how your packages get from point A to point B, and what people in logistics actually do to make this happen smoothly! The best logistics companies are like the perfect waiter, where your glass is constantly topped off and you go from your appetizer to entree to desert without even noticing they’re there. It’s time to bring us logistics people out of hiding to give you a better idea of what we do and how your company can make better decisions when it comes to logistics.

Be on the look out for our future posts, but in the meantime feel free to check out what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider by visiting our Core Services section. Or feel free to contact us if you have any questions! Looking forward to hearing from you!