What Does End-to-End Supply Chain Transparency Look Like?As consumer demands for transparency grows, the need for end-to-end supply chain visibility grows along with them—so what does such a supply chain look like?

Many of the changes in the way supply chains operate in recent years have come due to the pressure placed upon them to be more transparent. Customers (and others) want to know everything going on in a supply chain. They want to know what goes into creating their products, where they come from, how they are maintained, and much more.

Harvard Business Review underscored the importance of supply chain transparency in a post earlier this year,

Companies are under pressure from governments, consumers, NGOs, and other stakeholders to divulge more information about their supply chains, and the reputational cost of failing to meet these demands can be high.

As a result of this pressure, organizations are having to ensure that know about every aspect of their supply chains. That means them knowing their supply chain operations from start to finish. From where their raw materials are coming from to their product’s journey right into the customer’s hands. Moreover, they have to be able to easily share this information with their customers throughout the process. This is where end-to-end supply chains become a necessity.

This article by Morai Logistics explains what an end-to-end supply chain is and the prominent components such a supply chain needs for transparency.

What is End-to-End?

Investopedia defines end-to-end as,

End-to-end describes a process that takes a system or service from beginning to end and delivers a complete functional solution, usually without needing to obtain anything from a third party.

In the context of supply chains that means taking care of all the disparate operations that make them up. By having control of the totality of a supply chain, companies are able to guarantee that they know everything that’s going into them. In turn, reassuring their customers that their products are above board, ethical, and of good quality. But for their customers to be entirely satisfied, companies need to provide the necessary transparency throughout their operations. As such, their supply chains require certain characteristics to make that possible.

Digitized

The foundation upon which end-to-end supply chain management is built upon is digital transformation. The reason for this is that it enables the many technological tools that are needed for it. This includes automation, AI, machine learning, IoT, cloud computing, and more. Furthermore, it’s through such technologies that increased transparency becomes a reality.

For example, automation can increase the accuracy of data collection, making it easier to follow daily operations. Another is smart sensors, that can be put on the packages being shipped, providing information about where they are and what conditions they’re experiencing. Thus, it is through digitization that supply chains become intelligent and data driven. Consequently, they have more information for companies to provide their customers.

Connected

End-to-end supply chain should mean end-to-end visibility. A recent Supply Chain Digital article emphasizes this

A truly connected end-to-end supply chain has the aim to reach 100% visibility in real time which creates an integrated view across the enterprise, including, suppliers, retailers, manufacturers, outsource partners, and customers. This then allows companies to easily see any inbound problems and fire up tailored solutions where needed.

However, in order in ensure that there are no gaps in this visibility, supply chains require greater integration. Particularly, they need to have all their processes integrated. While some of that is achieved by social collaboration and dynamic strategy, that in of itself isn’t enough. Digital connectivity is equally important, as a well as having a central platform for all data to be aggregated.  Hence the need for digital transformation.

Traceable

One final component of transparency that may gain traction going forward is traceability. With the growth of blockchain, many are starting to place importance on being able to follow each transaction in a supply chain.

An ASQ article from earlier this year points out,

Traceability is also gaining prominence as a key issue, and permissioned blockchains provide one way to make this happen with sensor data and transaction data.

Digital Transformation - Top 5 Supply Chain Benefits

Digital transformation has become a big buzzword lately, but it is nonetheless key to companies having well functioning supply chains going forward. 

There has been an almost overnight paradigm shift regarding attitudes towards digital transformation. It has gone from being a goal to achieve at some nebulous future date to something that is a matter of survival. Companies of all kinds have come to see the numerous potential benefits of digitizing their practices and are embracing it as a result. The same is true of supply chains. Perhaps even more so.

An article by McKinsey explains as much,

McKinsey research suggests that, on average, companies that aggressively digitize their supply chains can expect to boost annual growth of earnings before interest and taxes by 3.2 percent—the largest increase from digitizing any business area—and annual revenue growth by 2.3 percent.

This article by Morai Logistics covers the top 5 advantages supply chains that digitize their operations are set to experience.

Decision-Making

A critical component of a healthy supply chain is the framework in place that drives its decision-making. Through the technological advancement digital transformation brings with it, that framework evolves as well. Getting access to machine learning in particular means supply chain managers can have very accurate predictions at their disposal. Which in turn can help them be much more precise with their decision-making.

As the earlier mentioned McKinsey article outlines,

Machine-learning systems can provide supply-chain managers with recommendations for how to deal with particular situations, such as changing material planning and scheduling in response to new customer orders.

Automation

In turn, digital transformation also unlocks automation. Which is set to play an enormous role in boosting supply chain productivity and efficiency. It does this in several ways. This includes reducing manual errors, completing laborious tasks faster, and making data collection more reliable and accurate. Automation is central in making tedious, repetitive supply chain work faster and more accurate, while involving less waste.

Customer Experience

Moreover, digitization brings with it a significant improvement to the customer experience companies can give their clients. This is because it enables clients to have end-to-end engagement. They can track their orders throughout the shipment and delivery process. This gives customers the transparency that they’re after and the peace of mind that comes with it.

Integrated Processes

Additionally, supply chains have gotten larger and more complex over the years. This is in large part due to the opportunities and costs globalization has brought with it. As such, it’s more important than ever for the many parts that make up a supply chain not to be silo’d but rather be integrated into one system where they can all be followed. Digital transformation means being able to have a single data management platform where all the disparate parts of a supply chain can be kept track of. This also means less resources and time spent on keeping up that tracking.

Future Growth

Finally, it’s important to keep in mind that digitization isn’t just some checkmark or objective to reach and move on from. It’s a mindset, culture, and infrastructure that allows for continued innovation and access to future technological advancements. It’s a foundation from which all future development can be built upon.

Slack addressed this in a post last year,

 New technologies will continue to shake up customer expectations and processes. A digital business builds resilience by replacing rigid structures and inflexible processes with a workplace culture and infrastructure that can respond and adapt to new demands.

The 7 Greatest Obstacles Supply Chains Face Today

As supply chains continue to get larger, they also continue to get more complex and complicated, leading to a number of challenges that they have to overcome.

Today’s supply chains are facing a whole host of new demands and hurdles. Supply chains are larger than ever. Not only that, they’re more sophisticated than ever before as well. While both of these things have a number of upsides, numerous obstacles arise as a result of them. Growth and progress come with difficulty, after all.

Blume Global highlights some of the ways modern supply chains have to evolve to the new demands placed upon them,

The modern supply chain must evolve to meet new demands and supply chain challenges, and supply chain managers need to plan ahead to keep everything flowing smoothly. A combination of consumer expectations, more routes to market, international complexities and other factors creates significant challenges throughout the supply chain network.

This article by Morai Logistics covers the 7 biggest challenges supply chains are currently facing.

Technology

With the rapid advancements in technology pertaining to supply chains, not integrating them is a considerable liability. Whether it be artificial intelligence, machine learning, automation, or some other innovation, they are all critical to running an optimal supply chain. More broadly speaking, that’s why digital transformation is such a fundamental part of the modern day supply chain.

Cybersecurity

With that being said, taking your supply chain digital also brings about further risk. It opens up your operations to the threat of hacking and other cybersecurity vulnerabilities. These can slow down down, disrupt, or halt the running of a supply chain. Thus, it’s of the utmost importance that, when digitizing, companies also secure their new technologies. This includes vetting their partners and vendors.

Forecasting

Given the previously mentioned increased size and complexity of the modern day supply chain, forecasting is more important than ever. As such, companies have to be as precise as possible with their supplies to meet customer demands.

The Houston Chronicle explains,

Proper forecasting helps ensure you have enough supply on hand to satisfy demand. An overestimation of demand leads to bloated inventory and high costs. Underestimating demand means many valued customers won’t get the products they want.

Overseeing Inventory

Tying into forecasting, is the need for the management of inventory. In order to have the adequate amount of supplies on hand to satisfy demand, companies need to be able to closely track their inventory. With that being the case, having proper count, visibility, and quality assurance of inventory is critical in today’s market. In order to meet these requirements, companies need to invest in the proper inventory management software and technology.

Market Expansion

Companies looking to grow will have a harder time than ever in today’s market. A company that expands its supply chain to new regions has to contend with a variety of issues. This includes new policies, cultural impediments, governmental incentives and disincentives, political instability, weather, and more. Without covering all these bases, a company is destined for failure.

Customer Service

Due to the all technological advancements mentioned earlier, customers are more particular in their demands than ever before. They want their orders delivered faster, with greater care, and for less. And it’s up to companies to cater their supply chains to those demands. In turn, however, through the utilization of technology such demands are more feasible than ever too.

Globalization

Finally, in many ways, globalization’s central to many of the obstacles outlined here. The market’s gotten larger, more interconnected, and complex. With that comes uncertainty, confusion, and externalities that are hard to prepare or mitigate for. Thus, companies have to account for these factors when constructing their supply chain strategies.

Robots, Cobots, and Bionic Workers - the Future of Supply Chains

The nature of supply chains are quickly changing with advent of robots, but that doesn’t mean human workers don’t have a place in them—here’s what the future of supply chains could look like. 

Much has been made of the advent of autonomous robots and what they mean for the future of supply chains. Questions have been raised over their growing prominence and whether human workers are set to be replaced. Recently, however, with cobots and bionic workers coming into the picture a new wrinkle has been added to this new paradigm.

It appears that robots and humans are no longer in a zero-sum game but rather can be most productive together. We’ve already talked about cobots, just what they are, how they bridge the human-robot divide, and how they will help supply chains. But they are just one component of an evolving work environment in supply chains.

This ebook explains what autonomous robots, cobots, and bionic workers are, why each of them are successful, and why supply chains will be using all three going forward.

What Work in Supply Chains Look like in the Future?

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The Path to and Benefits of a Zero Waste Supply Chain

Sustainability is becoming increasingly important in supply chains—here’s why a zero waste supply chain is not only realistic but beneficial. 

In recent years the expectation for companies to have supply chains that are sustainable has grown considerably. As a result, many have started making pledges and commitments outlining their transition to greener supply chains. Major companies like Nestle, Coca-Cola, and Unilever have all done so to varying degrees already. Other businesses will soon have to do the same if they’re to stay competitive in this environment.

As a recent article from Supply Chain Digital explains,

It’s clear that the ‘war on plastic’ is gaining momentum. As the world becomes more focused on the environmental impacts of plastic pollution, you should examine your supply chain and see how you can eliminate it.

With that said, converting a supply chain to zero waste doesn’t have to be difficult or complicated. And, in turn, if handled the right way, it can be useful beyond just meeting market demands.

This article by Morai Logistics highlights a realistic path to a zero waste supply chain and why having such a supply chain can be advantageous.

What is a Zero Waste Supply Chain?

A zero waste supply chain, just as the name suggests, is a supply chain that produces no waste. This means ensuring every step within the supply chain is sustainable—the materials are either reused or recycled, so that there is no trash. In turn, what this amounts to is no waste ending up in landfills or incinerators.

Such a goal might sound highly ambitious, verging on unfeasible, but that isn’t the case. Rather, it’s a necessary objective that companies like Unilever are already making a reality. Keep in mind that, for example, in the United Kingdom a majority of consumers are willing to pay more for products that don’t use plastic packaging. And that’s just plastic, only a single component of green supply chain. The demand is there. It’s up to companies to meet that demand.

Why is it Beneficial?

An entirely sustainable supply chain is beneficial for a number of reasons. First of all, it’s great for efficiency. Since zero waste supply chains cannot afford to be excessive in any way, that means they have to be careful with processes and materials that they are using. This leads to extreme efficiency. This efficiency leads to cost reduction, since less has to be spent on materials and superfluous operations.

Moreover, a sustainable supply chain is good for the environment. This isn’t just a feel-good benefit. It also means companies are likely to receive government incentives, while avoiding sanctions. Thus, it’s not only a good thing to do, it’s also a business friendly move. Additionally, it’s good for a company’s image, which in turn can attract more business.

How can Supply Chains Make a Transition to Zero Waste?

Making the switch to zero waste isn’t as challenging as it might seem. Like with any other major change, the first thing to do is come up with a strategy. In this case, a sustainable supply chain strategy. Then formulate reasonable goals as benchmarks on the route to the ultimate objective of zero waste.

Furthermore, it’s important to have key indicators that you can examine to see if you are being successful with those goals. Essentially, the transition is about starting broad (the strategy) and getting increasingly granular and specific until it’s ingrained into your company mindset and culture.

Finally, there are the four R’s as outlined by Unilever.

Unilever credits its four ‘R’ approach to achieving zero waste. The four R approach encompasses: reducing, reusing, recovering and recycling. Viewing waste in this way – as having various potential alternative uses – can be introduced across all businesses.

Cobots - What are They and How are They Helping Supply Chains?

Cobots or collaborative robots are changing the way supply chains operate, but just what are they and what makes them valuable?

Supply chains are in a state of transformation. Technological innovations are driving supply chains forward, making them more productive and efficient. Artificial intelligence, automation, robotics, blockchain technology, and many more other advancements in technology are taking supply chains to new heights. Digital transformation is central to most of these changes.

As an article from GlobeCon Freight Systems explains,

Supply chain management is undergoing a significant transition that will change the face of shipping and logistics. Companies who aren’t starting to plan for digitization aren’t going to recognize the industry in the years to come.

In many ways these develops are pushing out more and more human workers for their digital or robotic counterparts. This paradigm shift presents an opportunity for a technology that bridges the gap between and best utilizes human expertise and digital and robotic efficiency. That’s where cobots come in.

This week’s article by Morai Logistics discusses what cobots are and the many ways in which they are useful for a supply chain.

What are Cobots?

Cobots are collaborative robots. Robots that work with or side-by-side with humans.

Or, as the IFA expounds,

Collaborative industrial robots are complex machines which work hand in hand with human beings. In a shared work process, they support and relieve the human operator.

As such, they represent a middle ground between automation and human labor. With that in mind, just what benefits are they providing supply chains?

Increased Productivity

Just as with the use of regular robots, cobots, too, help boost productivity. Cobots are more accurate and less error-prone than humans, while also able to do more physically demanding tasks. What this results is an increase in output of whatever activity they’re tasked to perform. That, in turn, frees up the human workers they’re working alongside to focus on other activities that only they can do. In this way, productivity is improved on two fronts.

Reduced Worker Injury/Strain

As a consequence of cobots being able to handle the more laborious operations in a supply chain, workers avoid straining themselves.

A Supply Chain Dive post from earlier this year expands on this topic,

Industrial physical ailments like back strain tend to escalate when shelving is too high and picking volume has dramatically increased. Robotic picking can eliminate some of this risk.

Overcoming Long Distances

The spaces in warehouses are getting larger due to the market demands placed upon them.

CBRE’s Jack Fraker touches on in his post,

E-commerce operators require up to three times more space than traditional warehouse users due to a greater diversity in products handled and the need to have them immediately accessible.

Consequently, workers have larger distances to traverse in order to fulfill their requirements. Realistically, given customer expectations, this is an impossible task for workers—they need assistance. Thus, cobots are invaluable here. In conjunction with AI, cobots can bring the right shelves to the workers.

Happier Workers

Workers in a supply chain generally don’t get much enjoyment out of repetitive and laborious activities. Therefore, cobots taking care of such activities tend to make them considerably happier. Moreover, this leads to additional benefits like limiting reductions in motivation.

An article from WiredWorkers highlights this,

The boring, monotonous work will be outsourced to the robot so that employees will do their work more ‘humanely’… In this sense, robots contribute to an attractive working environment.

Easy Use and Implementation

Cobots are simple to use and straightforward to implement. Not only that, but their implementation is fast. Many traditional robots can take hours if not days to get ready, between their softwares being programmed and installed. Whereas cobots can be up in running in as soon as an hour.

How Predictive Maintenance is Changing Supply Chains

The aid of technology has changed supply chains in countless ways, with one of the most prominent drivers of change in recent years being predictive maintenance.

As supply chains get more complex, they require greater oversight and care. As such, with machines and robots and a variety of complex technology comes numerous benefits yet also potential points of weakness. If any of those key components in a supply chain malfunction or breakdown, they can bring it to a complete halt.

An article from GTI Predictive explains,

The cost of failing to manage supply chain systems effectively can be enormous . . . Taking all possible variables into account is critical to maintain steady prices and stay profitable . . . In 2018, supply chain interruptions occurred at a record rate of nearly 30%, costing billions in delays and wasted product.

This is where predictive maintenance comes in. It makes sure machines and robots in a supply chain are well maintained.

This week’s article by Morai Logistics explains just what predictive maintenance is and how it’s transforming supply chains.

What is Predictive Maintenance?

Achieving predictive maintenance comes by having a mindset and the technology to help fulfill it. That mindset involves emphasis on ensuring that machines and robots in a supply chain are actively maintained. Additionally, on the technological front, this approach is accommodated by IoT devices such as sensors that collect data and monitor conditions.

In turn, machine learning is the final component of predictive maintenance. It allows computers to analyze the data collected and makes predictions based off it. With that in mind, just what are the benefits this brings?

Proactive Supply Chains

Predictive maintenance means a foundational shift to how supply chains operate. They don’t have to be as responsive to what happens to them. Instead, predictive maintenance transforms a supply chain into being proactive. For example, it tracks machine health, resulting in machines that are in better condition. That is to say, a supply chain doesn’t have to wait for something to go wrong with a machine to provide it upkeep. Consequently, supply chains can tackle potential problems before they can even become problems.

More Data

With sensors continually attached to the machinery and robotics in a supply chain, data is regularly being collected. Above all, what this results in is a smarter, more efficient supply chain. In addition, as we’ve mentioned before, machine learning and artificial intelligence more generally does not perform well without a sufficiently large pool of data. By having big data to pull from, computers, via machine learning, can make more precise models and accurate forecasts. Therefore, predictive forecasting doesn’t only ensure better kept machines and robots but more knowledge to work with in general.

Less Disruption

By regularly scheduling maintenance on machines and robots as a result of predictive maintenance, the chances of either of them having issues becomes minimal. This is critical, as it means supply chains have a higher likelihood of running smoothly without disruptions. That in turn means more cost-reduction and improved earnings.

Supply Chain Dive explains this in their article on predictive maintenance,

The most common goal of predictive maintenance is improved uptime, with 51% of respondents in a PwC survey last year saying this was their organization’s reason for adopting the technology.

The Current and Future State of Block in the Supply Chain Industry Part Two

As blockchain technology is seeing considerable adoption in the supply chain industry, it’s important to see where it thrives and where it needs improvement if it’s going to continue its ascent. 

Blockchain technology is a revolutionary innovation for supply chains. Incredibly, despite how new it is, it’s already having a monumental impact upon them. We addressed this in our first ebook on blockchains. It covers just what blockchain is, how it works, and why it’s important to the industry.

Yet, given the recency of the technology’s invention, there remain concerns surrounding it. As such, it still requires a great deal of fine-tuning before it’s universally embraced. With that in mind, how well it does down the line is going to be dependent on how well it can adapt. With many demands currently being placed upon it, only time will tell if it will be able to.

This ebook explains what the current state of blockchain is in the supply chain industry, the technology’s strengths and weaknesses, and where it’s set to go in the coming years.

The Pros and Cons of Blockchain and Where it Will be in the Future
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That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? Interested in our 3rd party logistics services? If so, don’t hesitate to check out our services . We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news.

5 Ways the Cloud is Improving Supply Chain Management

As the demands placed upon supply chains become greater, new innovative mechanisms will be necessary to respond to those pressures—here’s how the cloud is addressing them.

The expectations placed upon supply chains are higher than ever. As a result, there’s a need for even stronger supply chain management. In turn, more powerful management platforms are needed. And, in response, many companies are turning to cloud computing to help deliver their management needs. Unlike some other recent technological innovations, cloud technology is already delivering the results.

Hunter Lowe from Select Hub emphasizes this,

Ask a supply chain executive about cloud computing, and they only want to know if it can deliver more speed, scale and accuracy. None of them care about the technology; all they want are results. Cloud applications and platforms are the growth catalysts that will keep improving supply chain performance…

This week’s article by Morai Logistics highlights 5 key ways in which clouds are making supply chain management better.

Flexibility

One of the most important things a modern day supply chain needs is the ability to adapt and grow. Not only that, but be responsive to the forces influencing it. By taking a cloud-based approach, managers gain access to easy scalability. Since clouds are hosted on the internet, they have no physical limitations placed upon them. What this means is supply chains can shrink and expand according to what’s required of them.

Low-Cost

Cloud technology, in comparison to the alternatives, is a fairly cost-effective avenue for supply chain management. First of all, it generally has an affordable installation fee, even for smaller businesses. Moreover, the subsequent costs associated with it are flexible due them being subscription fees that vary depending on the package a company selects.

In contrast, management softwares can have large implementation costs and be difficult to build upon. Not only that, but cloud’s save companies money down the line as well. By being able to host the latest and greatest technological advancements, cloud’s can make previous operational procedures cheaper via machine learning and automation.

Secure

This might be surprising to some, given the concerns about cloud-based security. However, it’s becoming increasingly clear that it’s not clouds themselves that are typically a security concern, it’s the practices around using them. As Gartner reported earlier this year,

Gartner estimates that the majority of cloud security failures will be the fault of the customers through 2023.

Gartner’s Peter Firstbrook further broke this down,

Organizations must invest in security skills and governance tools that build the necessary knowledge base to keep up with the rapid pace of cloud development and innovation.

With that in mind, with the necessary investment and skills, data security on the cloud is not only not a liability, it’s actually a strength.

Easy Integration & Connectivity

Supply chains today can be very large and unwieldy. Consequently, it’s critical that the systems used to manage them can tie together all their disparate parts. This requires systems with visibility, connectivity, and the ability to integrate the various networks that make up the supply chain.

Cloud computing is such a system. It allows for fast integration, can host a variety of different softwares and networks, and enables all this in real-time. Furthermore, as a result of being online, the cloud can keep all parties in a supply chain up to date on its latest developments.

Accessible

Finally, the concern with any new technology, especially one that will be as foundational as a cloud, is how complex it is. In turn, how this complexity might be a barrier to easy use. There needn’t be any such concern with cloud-based approach however. As an article from Supply Chain 24/7 explains,

In addition, there are numerous efficiency benefits, including simple and intuitive user experience, quick access to accurate and timely analytics, social collaboration tools, and much more – all of which can be accessed anywhere, at any time, and from virtually any device.

5 Impediments to Successful Artificial Intelligence Implementation in Supply Chains

Artificial intelligence (AI) is set to be pivotal to supply chains going forward, however, there are several obstacles supply chain managers will have to navigate if they’re successfully going to utilize it.

The state of artificial intelligence in supply chains is still something that is very much unfolding. Both AI and supply chains are multifaceted and thus have elements where they work well together and elements where they don’t. For example, a subset of AI like machine learning has become a prominent feature in forecasting. However, AI being used for self-driving trucks is still years away. Regardless, AI is undoubtedly deeply intertwined with supply chains. It has to be carefully integrated into them in order to work well.

This week’s article by Morai Logistics explores 5 barriers that supply chains face when attempting to make us of artificial intelligence.

Lack of Data

AI only works optimally if it has access to large amounts of accurate data. If there isn’t enough data or the data is of a low quality, the results it produces will suffer. Take machine learning for instance, in order to make predictions or employ its algorithms, a computing system needs enough clean data to pull from for its predictions to be accurate. Simply put, not having a large pool of consolidated up to date data for an AI is like having a sports car without any fuel.

Segmented Artificial Intelligence

Supply chain managers know that one part of their job is to keep an eye on the big picture. Supply chains may be broken up into many individual processes and procedures, but they come together to make the chain. As such, it’s critical that AI implementation be holistic. Much in the same way AI needs access to data that is clean and plentiful, it also has to have access to data that is uninterrupted. If an AI only has data split into disparate segments of a supply chain to work with, then it will produce commensurately uneven results.

Lack of AI Knowledge in the Workforce

Artificial intelligence is conceptually new. It’s also confusing for many. When introduced into a supply chain, supply chain managers may find that many along their chain having trouble adapting to its functions. This is entirely understandable given the often complex and changing nature of AI. With that being the case, supply chain leaders should be providing training for their workforce. Or, conversely, they can hire new personnel to make up for this knowledge gap.

Poor Understanding of AI Processes

Understanding how to use AI and what it’s there for is different from understanding what it’s specifically doing to produce its results. This leads to the “black box” problem—that being the results themselves being mysterious. If there isn’t a transparent AI operation in place, it will likely produce inexplicable results. These results then have to be accepted on faith.

As an article in Forbes highlighted earlier this year,

Black box solutions are controversial. With a black box solution, planners cannot see into the machine and understand how the forecasting engine is generating the forecast. They must trust the output. AI solutions are more likely to be black box than traditional solutions.

Measuring Success

The metrics used to gage success within a supply chain that adopts AI will change. AI transforms many functions in a supply chain. As a result, the indicators of success need to be adapted to these new supply chain realities. Moreover, the nature of AI and what it can do is in a state of continual development. Meaning measuring how successful it is can require continual adjustments of success markers with each development.