Team TPL - Race Finish - 01

Team True Patriot Love successfully completes Race Across America (RAAM) 2017, coming in second place and breaking the current Canadian record while raising over $120,000 for Canadian Veterans in support of the True Patriot Love Foundation.

Morai Logistics is proud to be the title sponsor of Team True Patriot Love (Team TPL), a team of eight Toronto cyclists that competed and successfully completed a race from coast-to-coast across the U.S. They competed in Race Across America, a grueling race that starts in Oceanside, California to Annapolis, Maryland.

Team TPL competed in order to raise money for True Patriot Love Foundation, a charity for veterans, military and their families. Not only did these amazing racers come in second place, they beat the current Canadian record. Team TPL completed the race, cycling 3070 miles, in 5 days, 17 hours, and 56 minutes. The previous record was 6 days, 2 hours, and 21 minutes.

The Logistics of Cycling from Coast-to-Coast Across America

As a third-party logistics provider, we understand transportation. Getting from one side of the United States to the other is no easy task. The riders from Team True Patriot Love, as mentioned in our previous post, has to endure various extreme conditions. It’s not surprising that Outside Magazine labels the RAAM as the “the toughest test of endurance in the world.”

Despite being a relay, the race is a grueling 24hr non-stop journey over multiple days. Climbing more than 50,000+ vertical metres while taking on the mountain ranges of Sierra Nevada, The Rockies and The Appalachians. They also have to endure temperature swings from 55+ degrees Celsius across the desert to -5 atop mountain passes.

But the more interesting for us logistics industry professionals is the way that this all must be managed for the crew of the cyclists. This is on top of the way the race demands protocol and process in and of itself.

Team TPL - Race Finish - 14

Managing Racers During Transitions is Its Own Supply Chain

The riders competed as two groups of four and had their own split of the total crew members. Eight racers were supported by a crew of 16 who handle the logistical aspects of supporting these riders across the entire journey, coupled with five support vehicles. This includes switching between riders, coordinating rest periods, and feeding both the riders and crew members over the ensuing week of non-stop racing.

We’ve collaborated with Team TPL to build a pre-race infographic to showcase some of the fun facts collected during training to achieve the impressive feat of beating the previous Canadian record. Check out their training facts below:

team-tpl-pre-race-infographic

No Better Time to Support Canadian Veterans

In line with Canada’s 150th Anniversary, the money raised from this race goes to the True Patriot Love Foundation. Their mission: to inspire every Canadian to contribute to the resilience and well-being of our military, Veterans and their families. The foundation works closely with the Canadian Armed Forces, Department of Veteran Affairs and local grassroots organizations. They work together to clearly identify the most urgent needs of Canadian military families on a national scale, while avoiding duplication of efforts between all other supporting organizations.

The entire Morai Logistics team is extremely proud to have supported these riders for their journey! We couldn’t have chosen a better group of riders to support, and they have gone above and beyond with their performance!

If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3PL provider, check out our services. We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news.

Morai-Logistics-Blog-Nintendo-Blue-Ocean-Approach

The final entry in a three-part series discussing why a Blue Ocean approach has led to Nintendo’s current supply chain predicament. For Part 1, click here to see our coverage on artificial scarcity, and for Part 2, click here to see our coverage on Nintendo’s Customer-Centric Philosophy.

In the first post of our series, we explored accusations of artificial scarcity leveled at Nintendo. It’s customer-centric ethos was covered next. For this final entry, we will be diving into how this ethos birthed its Blue Ocean strategy. A move that lead to its recent Switch supply controversy, and is responsible for the strength of its brand.

Blue Oceans and Big Waves

Nintendo is constantly trying to find previously unknown market spaces through innovation. This process is known as the Blue Ocean Strategy and it involves eight steps. According to BlueOceanStrategy.com, the key aspects of the strategy involve:

  1. Grounded in data
  2. Pursues differentiation and low cost
  3. Creates uncontested market space
  4. Empowers you through tools and frameworks
  5. Provides a step-by-step process
  6. Maximizes opportunity while minimizing risk
  7. Builds execution into strategy
  8. Shows you how to create a win-win outcome

From launching the hand-held market to saving the North American video game industry, Nintendo has built an empire on previous undiscovered or overseen markets. The best recent example is the Wii console, which launched in 2005. It managed to sell over 100 million units, outperforming Sony’s Playstation 3 and Microsoft’s Xbox 360 consoles. The Wii’s 20 million sale lead was despite it having outdated hardware, lack of third-party support and absent hardware features like Blu Ray and HD support. And of course, it was plagued by scarcity for the first two years of its life cycle.

A Console for More than the Average “Gamer”

The Wii sold well because it became inclusive to families and non-gamer friends through motion controls. For decades, both game mechanics and controllers had been getting more complex. This meant that only those with plenty of free time could keep up. Instead, Nintendo built the console around controls that were as easy to use as waving your hands, reintroducing gaming to the entire family. Its competitors tried to emulate the success by launching their own motion controls.

However, their products weren’t built from the ground up with motion controls in mind, leading to mixed results.
Sony and Microsoft sold their consoles at a huge loss to win a place in a home. Nintendo side-stepped this problem. It created a spot for itself as the secondary home console. By using older, but still effective technology, it managed to turn a profit with each unit sold.

New Markets Offer Little Guidance

Trying to create an entirely new market means that there’s no best practice to follow or improve on. How outside forces can affect the nascent market and supply chain is also limited. In the Switch’s case, the shortages seem to be because of Apple. Wall Street Journal writer Takashi Mochizuki points out:

Nintendo Co.’s biggest battle these days isn’t against other makers. It is against companies such as Apple Inc. that are gobbling up the same parts Nintendo needs to make its hit Switch machine.

Similar situations can be found throughout the company’s product launches. By being so focused on innovation, its ability to adapt is restricted. Factors such as competing industries for resources, port strikes and even excess demand have all proved too taxing for its supply chain.

Nintendo is notoriously conservative with its business practices. But if you look at the success of its products, this isn’t the problem. What needs updated is its approach to supply chains. The company needs better predictive models. Despite its setbacks however, Nintendo has built its brand on innovation. It’s why its products have become cultural icons in the first place.

If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news.

Morai-Logistics-Blog-Nintendo-Switch-Part-2

While modern companies focus on providing exceptional service, Nintendo continues to focus on extraordinary products with a Customer-Centric approach.

In our last post, we began exploring the reasons behind Nintendo’s history of not meeting consumer demand. Many of its gaming consoles, software, peripherals and promotional items in the last 20 years have seen instances of scarcity across its North American and European markets. Limited supply, inflated grey market prices, and angry consumers have been the result.

Nintendo’s latest console, the Switch, launched a few months ago with similar supply shortages. Some customers and press accused the company of intentionally limiting production to drive sales given the familiarity of the situation.

What’s behind the latest supply issues is the company’s customer-centric philosophy, not artificial scarcity.

Artificial Scarcity Isn’t the Problem

On the surface, Nintendo’s selling practices may seem to favour artificial scarcity to drive sales. The problem with this theory, is that artificial scarcity is only ever a short-term solution for luxury products. Artificial scarcity only generates demand because of perceived scarcity. The actual value of the product isn’t considered, meaning that the company doing it has little incentive to innovate the product. After a certain point, and despite a company’s attempts, there will be too much of a product in circulation for it to maintain its price.

Nintendo is a nearly 140-year-old multi-national company, iconic and influential in its industry. If it followed the same strategy as the former Beanie Baby empire, it would’ve folded decades ago.

The ‘problem’ with Nintendo’s management and supply chain strategies, is that they’re very customer-centric.

Customer-Centric: An Old but Effective Model for Nintendo

Newcomers like Amazon, Uber and PayPal have been disruptive to many industries. However, their biggest contribution is the latest trend of customer-focused strategies. Many companies are now trying to streamline their services to better improve the customer experience.

Ken Ramoutar of Avanade Insights, highlights what a customer-centric focus involves:

  • Anticipate your future needs looking at behavioural patterns, market trends, leveraging data from inside and outside the organization
  • A unique and memorable experience; seamless across your interaction channels
  • Analytics to inspect call logs and problem reports to feed changes in supply and production

None of these describe Nintendo’s business practices or product design philosophy. In fact, the company is notorious for being especially conservative in an industry that’s in constant flux.

Nintendo and Unique Gaming Experiences

Nintendo’s focus throughout its long history, is on creating products that provide a unique experience in and of themselves. Unlike its past (Sega) and current competitors (Sony and Microsoft), the company never bothered to chase the latest technological, marketing or business trends. This historically had both good and bad results for the company at different points in its history. However, it has allowed it to remain strong in the face of ever ballooning industry costs. Sony and Microsoft may have millions of dollars to throw behind their development and marketing strategies, but Nintendo has its Blue Ocean Strategy.

That’s it for this week’s post. In the final entry of this three-part series, we’ll describe how Nintendo’s Blue Ocean Strategy and customer-centric approach has led it to continue to be a dominating force within its industry.

If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news.

Morai-Logistics-Blog-Nintendo-Switch

Beloved entertainment giant Nintendo has a long history of trouble getting their products to the right hands.

Almost two months ago, video game giant Nintendo released its latest console—the Switch. Although it received a lot of positive coverage, a familiar problem has been marring the consumer goodwill; extreme product scarcity.

The company’s sales forecasts were off. They were so off that additional Switch consoles had to be flown to their North American and European distributors. Although Nintendo took a drastic action and its been two months since the launch, the consoles are still hard to find. Some are even claiming that it’s a case of artificial scarcity.

Before we can begin to answer the question of Nintendo’s possible motives, there’s a few basics that need to be gone over.

Make it Rare, Make it Wanted

The scarcity of a commodity or a service is an important element of the business model. If there’s a lack of supply, the price will likely go up. If there’s overproduction, the price will start going down. While scarcity is a natural and fundamental part of a free market, artificial scarcity is not.

Artificial scarcity happens when an individual, company or organization creates a scarcity either through technology, production or law, where there would otherwise be the capacity for an abundance.

A classic example would be the Beanie Babies during the 90s. Ty Warner, the person behind the craze, “would retire specific animals at whim, creating scarcity in the market and inspiring collectors to pay up to $5,000 for a plush toy that originally retailed for $5” writes New York Post contributor, Larry Getlen:

Ty’s website further fueled the phenomenon, as the company used it to make retirement announcements and to speculate on possible retirements, dropping hints that drove collectors to buy or sell different lines. Some sellers even began changing prices throughout the day based on website updates

In the end, the Beanie Baby empire came crashing down. Collectors became overwhelmed by all the new product lines and regular customers got tired of fighting with scalpers. The rise and fall of Beanie Babies is a lesson in how even the hottest products can tank if consumers aren’t respected.

Nintendo Has a History of Underestimating Demand

While misjudging demand is something many businesses go through, Nintendo is a special case. Pretty much every piece of hardware released by the company has met with supply problems.
Just to list a few, here are some examples:

  • NES Classic Mini. Retailed for $60 USD, now on Ebay for $250+ and climbing.
  • Amiibos, RFID-enabled collectable gaming peripherals originally sold for $12.99. Some of harder to find ones ended up selling on the grey market for over $100 USD.
  • New 3DS XLs were impossible to get a hold in NYC when they released earlier this year according to an article from The Verge.

Just from these examples (there are many more), it’s safe to say that the company has a history of seriously understating the demand for it’s products. Many potential customers are turned-off from buying Nintendo products for this very reason.

Is it a problem with Nintendo’s supply chain or management? What if the problem is intentional, the supply intentionally restricted as many consumers suspect? The answer to these questions require nuance which is why we’ll leave off answering them until the next blog post. Check back again soon for the second part of this two-part topic.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news.

Earlier this month, Research and Markets added to their “Third Party Logistics (3PL) Market Analysis By Service, By Transport (Roadways, Railways, Waterways, Airways), By End-Use (Manufacturing, Retail, Healthcare, Automotive), By Region, And Segment Forecasts, 2014 – 2025” report.

Experts are estimating the 3PL market to reach USD $1.24 trillion within the next decade. That’s a massive increase considering that the current market is estimated to sit at USD 721 billion according to Armstrong & Associates, Inc. There are eight reasons why this is the case. That’s why this month we thought we’d focus our infographic on the top market growth predictions for 2025 when it comes to the third-party logistics industry.

Third-Partly Logistics Market Growth Predition for 2025

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As business around the globe continue to expand their operations, the 3PL market will continue to parallel its growth. The Research and Markets updates highlight how this will affect revenue and coverage. Overall, it looks like the next few years will be a good time for the 3PL market.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news.

Morai-Logistics-Blog-retired-shipping-containers

Shipping containers are great for transportation, but did you know they can also fulfill an important construction role?

If there’s an item synonymous with shipping, its shipping containers. Whether they are moved through land, air or sea, shipping containers play a crucial role in supply chains. In 2014 alone, the number of these containers moved globally was estimated at 560 million. That’s around 1.5 billion tons of cargo moved all together according to science magazine Nautilus.

There is one not so little problem however. With the increasing complexity and growing level of global integration of supply chains, their numbers keep increasing. Because of the demands of frequent travel, each is built to last. So, what do you with the ones that need to be retired?

Fast Facts About Shipping Containers

Shipping containers are an industry staple, they can carry anything from clothes to cell phones. Key commodities like petroleum, coal and various metals are regularly occupy these containers when they need to be shipped.

Some interesting trivia from Billie Box shows how ubiquitous shipping containers have become for transportation.

  • The life of a shipping container can last between 18-25 years provided it’s well-maintained.
  • A standard 20′ shipping container can hold 1,170 cubic feet and the max gross weight is 30T with a tare weight of 2.2T. A 40′ high cube contains 2,700 cubic feet and the max gross weight is 32.5T with a tare weight of 3.8T.
  • 95% of the world’s cargo is moved by ship.
  • Around 10,000 containers are estimated to be lost at sea annually. Of this number, many incur damage from waves and sink quickly. The problem is when they float just below the surface of the water. When this happens, they pose a danger to sailing vessels.

Repurposing Old Shipping Containers

shipping-container-repurpose

Photo Credit: Noah Sheldon/The Wall Street Journal

Many used containers are finding a new purpose as building materials this Wall Street Journal article explains. Shipping container architecture, also referred to as ‘cargotecture’ or ‘arkitainer’, is growing in popularity, showing up in restaurants, homes, theme parks and even prison cells.

According to the article, about 1 million containers are sold annually for inland use. 70 thousand containers were sold by Maersk Like alone. That number is double what it was in 2015.

Industry leaders cited in the article claim that building with containers can be 20% cheaper and 40% faster than using traditional building materials. However, this doesn’t necessarily mean all the buildings in your neighbourhood will be replaced any time soon. Costa Paris writes:

Containers must be cut when stacked to widen the living space or to create windows and doors, and need to be insulated from the inside and reinforced with steel beams in multistory structures. And after they are put together, conversions or expansions are difficult and expensive

Shipping containers won’t replace traditional building materials, but they are filling an important niche. As supply chains become more complex, the number of containers that need to be retired will also grow. Thankfully, across the world they are providing alternative housing, storage and venue solutions.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news.

Morai-Logistics-Blog-Uniqlo-Fast-Fashion

Uniqlo is speeding up its production cycle to compete in the shipping race with other fashion retailers by compressing its design-to-deliver supply chain down to just 13 days.

Few things in life move as fast as fashion trends. Just as a style becomes widely accepted, its immediately replaced by something new and different. It’s no surprise then that self-styled fashionistas want what’s hot on the catwalk as soon as they see it.

Fashion retailers try to oblige by optimizing aspects of their supply chain so the latest trends reach mainstream consumer markets as quickly as possible. There’s even a term for the process, it’s called ‘fast fashion’.
This is top priority for retailers such as Peacocks, H&M, Topshop and Zara. And now, it’s also Uniqlo’s guiding philosophy as of this March announcement.

What ‘Fast Fashion’ Means to the Uniqlo Brand

Uniqlo embracing the fast model marks a departure for the company. For years, its brand message was of “quality first, then price” and “simple made better”. It never really chased the most current trends, instead opting for providing wardrobe essentials. However, 2016 saw a disappointing year for the retailer. The company made a 40% cut to its revenue predictions for the next five years. It’ll now be putting more resources into something Zara has been doing well—speed.

According to Bloomberg, Uniqlo is trying to compress its design-to-deliver chain down to just 13 days. Despite the reduced time, company owner Tadashi Yanai is assuring customers that the Uniqlo brand will retain its identity:

Zara sells fashion rather than catering to customer needs. We will sell products that are rooted in people’s day-to-day lives, and so based on what we hear from customers.

Uniqlo also announced it plans to improve its supply chain with heavily automated production facilities and artificial intelligence to determine the most efficient design and delivery routes.

Fast Fashion for a World Where Everything is Fast

An article on Glossy.co covering fast fashion suggested that the philosophy of faster delivery is linked to instant gratification, and for many retailers, it has helped lower the return rate. Writer Jeff Manoff describes how during the New York Fashion Week, big names such as Ralph Lauren, Michael Kors and Tommy Hilfiger revealed see-now, buy-now styles. Several retailers even had one-day delivery options.

There are a few reasons why this is happening according to Manoff:

  • In eight years, the total sale of luxury sales online is estimated to reach $90 billion.
  • Delivery times have been decreasing. They went from nearly 5 days in 2013 to around 4 days just two years later.
  • Customer expectations have also shifted. Unless a delivery is made within two days of purchase, it’s no longer considered “fast”.
  • Even same-day delivery may no longer be enough. Some retailers are now offering one-hour and 90-minute deliveries.
  • Faster delivery is linked to a decrease in return rate which helps overall sales.

Closing Thoughts on Uniqlo’s Clothing Logistics

Uniqlo’s literal change of pace may be a shock to some of its customers. However, it shouldn’t be too much a surprise for anyone looking fashion retail industry trends. Customers want and expect to have things immediately after they order them. As online shopping grows, the number of people with similar demands will also increase. If the fashion, or any retail industry really, wants to stay viable, it’ll need to shorten its supply chain and speed up delivery.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news.

Mexico continues its rise as an important global logistics hub with the opening of a new container terminal at the Lázaro Cárdenas port, earlier this month. There are ten reasons why this is important to companies with supply chains in South America.

Lázaro Cárdenas is Mexico’s busiest port and considered one of Latin America’s most important. With the improvements, it’ll also be the continent’s most modern port. According to the World Bank, Mexico’s imports have grown more than 30% since 2010. Container volumes are also up 60% in just the last three years. These statistics, along with the fact that it has more than 45 free trade agreements, is the reason behind Mexico’s meteoric rise as an important global logistics hub.

That’s why this month we’re going to be focusing on how this new port is something to be very exited about for cross-border logistics and supply chain professionals looking south of the border!

10 Reasons to be Excited About the New Lázaro Cárdenas Container Terminal

Morai-Infographic-LazaroCardenas

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news.

online shopping image spread

Changing consumer behaviour is reshaping and revitalizing industrial sectors by funneling resources into warehouse construction.

According to an article by the Wall Street Journal (WSJ), the digital market place is having a physical impact on urban landscapes. Throughout the U.S, industrial pockets are seeing a “economic renaissance” reports the article’s author, Erica E. Phillips.

Large city malls and brick & mortar stores are being closed throughout the country due to dropping consumer interest. In their place, more people are shopping online for what they need. As a result, more warehouses are needed to store everything. This has led to formerly struggling industrial areas receiving fresh investment as land prices for new distribution centres increases.

Online Shopping—The World’s Biggest Marketplace

It can be hard to imagine, but even the idea of online shopping is still relatively new. The earliest version of the concept only dates back to 1979. Industry giants such as Amazon, Alibaba and Ebay are only 23, 18 and 22 years old respectively. In the two decades since they started (a little less in Ebay’s case) they, and companies like them, have revolutionized how people shop.

According to Statistica.com:

  • In 2013, US mobile commerce revenue amounted to more than 38 billion US dollars
  • Alternative payment methods such as digital wallets or online payment providers have seen increased adoption rates and rapid growth in the past few years. Ebay-owned PayPal is one of the current market leaders with more than 14 billion US dollars in mobile payment volume alone
  • A 2016 study by analytics firm comScore found that shoppers make around 51% of their purchases online. The number of has been consistently rising by 1% for the last few years

Even luxury retailers are turning towards being more online shopping-friendly. A different WSJ article reported that retailers of high-end goods are scrambling to go online as sales are starting to fall. This is because even wealthy customers like having access to better deals and selection at their finger tips.

From Shopping Centre to Housing, and Neighbourhood Mall to Restaurants

As more families shop for their necessities online, where does that leave traditional brick and mortar stores? Unsurprisingly, many have either dedicated part of their operations to compete online themselves, changed to become more service-based, or closed down altogether.

Phillips comments on how the space shopping centres used to occupy is being re-purposed:

Many cities are razing downtown shopping centers from a bygone era to make way for hotels, office buildings and new housing developments. Suburban malls trying to keep the doors open have shifted their focus to higher-scale restaurants and new entertainment offerings, such as golf driving ranges, wall climbing and skydiving simulators.

All this is a win-win for consumers and urbanites. As warehouses become a way a life for formerly struggling communities, consumers everywhere will have access to a wider range of products and deals. The weekly shopping can then be completed in just a few minutes. This leaves more time for a family to explore the new restaurants that have sprung up where the old malls used to be.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news.

Morai-Logistics-Blog-3-logistics-supply-chain-insights-career

With many career options, interest in logistics and supply chains is growing as more people want to know where their purchases came from. But did you know how large and varied the entire logistics and supply chain industry is? When thinking about career options, there’s a whole world or responsibilities awaiting this industry.

Technology such as RFIDs, barcodes and the internet have allowed for products to tell their rich histories to consumers. It’s not surprising then that more people are becoming interested in how things get from A to B. That interest may even grow to become an active step towards a career in the logistics and supply chain field.

However, the industry is much more encompassing than most people realize. It can even seem overwhelming if you haven’t done your research. To get a better understanding of the field, we’ve compiled a list of three things to know before you make the jump.

1. It’s a Bigger and More Varied Industry Than You Think

The logistics and supply chain industry is big, very big. In the U.S alone in fact, over 55 million tons of freight was moved daily in 2013. The freight was valued at $50 billion. Both numbers have since grown. As of 2015, U.S business logistics costs alone sat at $1.48 trillion.

These numbers aren’t surprising. Although the industry goes mostly unnoticed by most people, it’s responsible for every step of a product’s journey from the manufacturer to the customer’s hands. The process isn’t simple, it involves a lot of moving parts and planning. Various stages of delivery and transportation are involved to ensure they reach the right location at the right time.

With companies becoming bigger, more international in reach and scope, the demand and complexity of supply chains grows as well.

2. Logistics is Not the Same as Supply Chains

There’s a distinction between supply chain and logistics, although the two terms are sometimes used interchangeably.

Quora contributor Anastasia Kelm, outlines the differences clearly in this discussion thread.

Logistics — That part of supply chain management that plans, implements, and controls the efficient, effective forward and reverse flow and storage of goods, services, and related information between the point of origin and the point of consumption in order to meet customers’ requirements.

Supply Chain — The planning and management of all activities involved in sourcing and procurement, conversion, and all logistics management activities. Importantly, it also includes coordination and collaboration with channel partners, which can be suppliers, intermediaries, third-party service providers, and customers.

3. There’s Plenty of Opportunity to Grow the Career That You Want

According to a Fortune.com article, the logistics industry will need to fill 1.4 million jobs by next year. That estimate is conservative when you remember the explosive growth of e-commerce in recent years.

The truth is, even if you don’t have a relevant degree (or a degree at all), there’s still plenty of opportunities for you. Logistics is a vast industry and functional supply chains are a building block of any successful business. Not everyone looking to start a career in this field needs to be an operational manager or a truck driver either. There’s many jobs in warehousing, material handling, packaging, and management software. That’s to say nothing of support functions like HR, marketing and communications.

To learn more, check relevant job statistics on sites like Glassdoor and see what enrollment would be like at your local post-secondary school. Regardless of the avenue you plan on taking, do your research and determine for yourself if this dynamic field is right for you.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news.