Supply Chain Management - Top 5 Cost-Saving Tips

Of the many ways companies can boost their profitability, simply reducing the costs of their supply chain remains one of the most overlooked.

Companies, on average, are spending more than they need to on their supply chains. The numbers bear this out. Benchmarking Success audits businesses to see how they are doing on average compared to industry bests. With that data, the Logistics Bureau found that,

They have audited almost 1,000 enterprises in different sectors to find that whereas supply chains accounted on average for around 9.8% of sales, the overall rating for best in class for supply chains as a portion of sales was just 5.7%.

With that in mind, clearly the industry as a whole should be doing a lot better in reducing supply chain expenses. While there are innumerable ways to go about this, below are 5 of the most important:

  • Strategy
  • Knowing the customer
  • Using 3PLs
  • Automation
  • Forecasting

This week’s article by Morai Logistics examines the 5 best ways to reduce supply chain costs.

Strategy

Strategy is the basis on which an efficient supply chain is built. It is the framework that holds it in place as it commences. As such, if companies don’t sufficiently plan out their supply chain strategy, there’s a high probability of excess in its expenses. A strategy needs to be precise, flexible to differing situations and customer demands, easy to understand, and involve every facet of the supply chain.

Knowing the Customer

It’s crucial to know your customer and personalize the supply chain to them. Otherwise, the potential for waste greatly increases. After all, you can have the most meticulous and well-run supply chain in a vacuum. However, when that supply chain has to adapt to your customer’s needs, it functions poorly. Or, it manages to adapt to customer needs, but that adds unnecessary expenses to chain. It’s crucial to avoid that by having a well functioning supply chain that has room to cater to the customer.

Use a 3PL

Conversely, rather than handling the supply chain planning within your company, you can hire a 3PL provider. 3PLs specialize at making supply chains as systematic and well-run as possible. As a result, as a company you only have to make a fixed payment, no unexpected costs, and the rest will be handled by the 3PL provider.

Automation

Automation allows for many operations and processes along a supply chain to be made more efficient, saving time and manpower—both areas where a lot of money can be sunk. Thus, as a company you can see boosts in productivity at most points along your supply chains. Automation can be applied to warehouses, inventory, data collection, transport, and more.

Forecasting

Uncertainty in demand can lead to a great deal of waste and inefficiency. If market demands are higher than companies expect, then their supplies can be lacking. On the other hand, if companies have plenty of inventory but the demand isn’t there, that inventory is wasted. By having accurate forecasting, companies have the ability to align their supplies with the demands of the market, leading to minimal waste in the supply chain.

Supply Chain - Customer Service and Technologies that Will Deliver it

Despite all the talk about blockchain technology, one of the preeminent challenges supply chains still face is customer service, and there are several technologies that could be the key to addressing it.

Customer service is an ongoing priority in the supply chain industry. Customers, now more than ever, need a seamless experience across a supply chain. Customers want their orders delivered faster. They want them delivered more accurately. They demand transparency throughout the process. Moreover, they expect an ability to track their deliveries. And, in turn, they expect inventory to meet their demand. More than anything, customers expect an experience modified to their individual needs.

A 2018 Logility and APICS survey on supply chain priorities revealed that,

30% highlighted the need to respond to customer mandates for faster, more accurate and unique fulfillment as a top business priority moving forward

The industry is well aware of the importance of customer service and is making it a top priority to solve. For companies to address this issue, however, they’ll need to adopt the precision, productivity, and granularity technology brings.

This week’s article by Morai Logistics details the difficulties customer service presents supply chains and how various technologies can solve them.

Artificial Intelligence (AI)

The term “AI” is so prominent in so many industries that are dealing with or relying on technology that it’s something of a buzzword at this point. But, there is a reason for this, it is providing unprecedented benefits to companies the world over. The supply chain industry is no exception. Through AI, companies will be able to optimize their chains from start to finish. Gaining access to analytics and forecasting that will be crucial to getting the most out of their operations. Thus, the faster and more accurate deliveries customers want can be achieved.

Automation

Automation achieves many of the same results AI does. By being able to automate many of the processes in a supply chain, it becomes more efficient. Operations in warehouses, involving data collection, and transportation, should all be automated. In turn, supply chains can become more transparent and reliable, on top of being faster and more cost-effective.

Mobile Applications

In the short-to-medium term, mobile applications might be the most useful technology this article covers.

A 2018 report highlighted by eMarketer stated,

Mobile devices and apps (27.9%) were cited as the technology that would deliver the most innovation benefits in five years.

Their are several reasons for this. Key among them is convenience. Everyone carries mobiles. As such, accessing these supply chain applications is simple, any time, any place. These applications enable supply chain managers the ability to get real-time updates and closely monitor their inventory and operations. Consequently, this brings a degree of granularity to the customer experience unlike what was achievable before. Supply chain managers can continually monitor the various activities that make up their chain and customize them to fit their clients’ needs.

Inventory and Warehouse Management Softwares

Softwares that allow for the management of inventory and warehouses are tremendous tools for optimal customer service. They provide visibility, control, and tracking of inventory. Moreover, they assist in meeting customer demands, by tracking inventory levels and making sure they are in the desired range. Finally, like all the other technologies covered here, they improve the accuracy, speed, and reliability of deliveries.

Supply Chain Management - Globalization

Alongside the many opportunities globalization presents for the supply chain industry are potential pitfalls, as such, preparing for them is crucial to the industry’s health.

Globalization has had many positive effects on supply chains. From greater market growth due to an increase in demand, to greater connectivity due the rise of the internet. With that said, the many positives have come with corresponding risks.

Milosz Majta, outlines this in his Forbes article,

Just as there are benefits and costs of globalization, there are similar pros and cons of a global supply chain. In particular, companies need to manage the related risks.

This means that those managing supply chains need to be able to mitigate for these risks if they want to see the upsides of globalization. After all, globalization is like any other major develop in market demand and pressure, resulting in both opportunities and threats. Crucially, the ability for companies to sufficiently overcome these threats is greater than ever. This in no small part being due to advances in machine learning, artificial intelligence (AI), and automation.

This week’s article by Morai Logistics highlights the obstacles that supply chains face as a consequence of globalization and what they can do to solve them.

Harmful External Factors

When managing a supply chain on a global scale, damaging external factors are more likely to come into play. These factors can look like political instability in countries, natural disasters, wars, etc. Ultimately what any of these factors amount to is a potential breakdown in supply chains. If a country’s government is in turmoil, its ports could be affected. If war breaks out, certain supply chain routes may no longer be safe. The same applies to a dangerous weather event. All these factors become more likely due to the scale and variability globalization brings with it.

This a risk that can’t always be mitigated for by its very nature—it’s external. The best a company can do is to have contingency strategies in place for each potential event. Even then, its strategy will ultimately be reactive. In turn, this threat does present an argument for regionalization. As regionalization reduces the problems of scale and instability.

Uncertainty

Market demands and trends become harder to prepare for the more actors that can influence a supply chain that are at play. With globalization comes the largest number of actors possible. In turn comes a staggering influx of data which gets increasingly hard to process, analyze, and make predictions off. Thus, supply chain companies have the potential to be floundering in the dark.

Here is where technological advancements become crucial in combatting globalization threats. By being able to automize data entry and collection, as well as process that data via AIs, this threat is greatly minimized. Once data collection becomes an automated procedure, keeping track of data becomes simple. And, with that data, an AI can make predictions and forecasts that make better sense of the market.

Complexity

More links in a supply chain mean more points of possible weakness within it. With globalization, supply chains are longer, involve more stops, take more time, and include multiple lines of communication. Consequently, this greater complexity requires greater oversight, as even one weak link can vitiate the whole chain.

This byproduct of globalization can be addressed in large part through the technologies mentioned previously. The increasing complexity in supply chains can be simplified by automating processes along it. Moreover, the reliability of a supply chain can be increased by the forecasting of AIs. Finally, the oversight needed along each link in the chain can be better achieved through blockchain technology.

Morai-logistics-regionalization-catalyst-supply-chain-efficiency

In response to growing customer expectations, supply chains are looking at regionalization as a way to be more efficient.

At the beginning of this year, Morai Logistics presented 4 supply chain and logistics trends to watch for 2019. Included in this list were the current capacity crunch, transportation regulation mandates and direct-to-consumer fulfillment that result from an increase in consumer expectations. To expand their distribution capacity, supply chains have tried localizing production through a strategy called demand-chain. Yet, the continued growth of the market is so pervasive, that the industry must continue to innovate.

According to Supply Chain Management Review, globalization has pushed supply chains to think smaller when it comes to tackling the big picture. Rather than disperse manufacturing across the globe, research indicates that regionalization is a more viable option. Organizations benefit from mobilizing products closer to the consumer, and also help remove barriers associated with efficiency and delivery.

This article by Morai Logistics explores the concept of regionalization, or post-globalization, and its current impact on the supply chain industry. It also aims to outline the benefits organizations gain from implementing this type of organizational restructuring.

Regionalization at a Glance

As mentioned above, regionalization has been found to be a product of globalization. It’s a form of organizational restructuring that aims to address ‘visibility and velocity’. The idea here is to propose a greater emphasis on meeting the growing expectations of consumers that are influenced by globalization. It also moves us to ask the question, can regionalization actually act as a catalyst for supply chain efficiency?

Research defines regionalization as involving…

The reorganization and division of manufacturing into smaller segments and more localized economies.

Global supply chains are very complex and can lead organizations down a path with greater risk and vulnerability. However, a consistent factor that has been a positive contributor to both globalization and regionalization is technology. How industries learn to leverage and apply manufacturing technology, enables organizations to create regional supply chains.

In order to lead in a fairly competitive industry, supply chains must become more strategic. According to Global Supply Chain Ecosystems writer, Mark Millar,

World class organisations no longer perceive the supply chain as merely tactical support for business as usual, but take a holistic position that their supply chain is what drives the business.

This has never been more applicable than when it relates to regional supply chains. As customer expectations continue to grow, there are considerable advantages to having production closer to home. Let’s explore some of the top advantages that regionalization provides organizations.

Benefits of Regionalization

To meet the growing needs of consumers, organizations must ensure their supply chains are efficient and agile. That means working technologies to create efficient, cost-effective solutions. As mentioned above, technology plays an integral role in enabling supply chains to become innovative at their approach to moving product.

When an organization breaks down a complex supply chain into smaller regional locations, they are able to streamline processes with ease. In addition, they achieve the following benefits:

  • Create visibility across supply chains
  • Increase the velocity and agility of supply chains
  • Improve response rates to ‘market changes’
  • Deliver consumer expectations and demand

In conclusion, supply chains must continue to evolve their structure in order to compete and meet the needs of today’s consumers. While the impacts of globalization remain, there is a need to respond to change in a more efficient and agile manner. Regionalization is a beneficial way for supply chains to utilize their existing networks of manufacturers, by separating them into smaller sites. This will ultimately help organizations bring product home to their customers, while differentiating the business and improving performance.

morai-logistics-private-equity-executives-struggle-to-understand-supply-chain-management-value

When it comes to driving business growth, research reveals that private equity executives struggle to understand supply chain managers’ value.

Across North America, organizations and companies depend on supply chains for a wide range of core functions. However, the Global Supply Chain Institute (GSCI) found that private equity executives had a different opinion. In a 2018 survey that included the opinions of 50 executives, supply chain functions were ranked as ‘relatively unimportant’. In addition, only 16% stated that they implemented a ‘multi-year strategies for achieving supply chain excellence’.

According to Investopedia, a supply chain is defined as,

Network between a company and its suppliers to produce and distribute a specific product to the final buyer.

In addition to transporting goods from point A to point B, supply chains also help companies ‘reduce cost’ and ‘remain competitive’. Therefore, why would a company consider a supply chain to be unimportant?

This article by Morai Logistics reinforces the critical role supply chains play in the growth of an organization. It also discusses the implications that may occur when an optimized supply chain isn’t integrated.

Supply Chains and Business Growth

When we make a purchase on a digital platform for instance, we usually can expect our item to arrive within 3 to 5 business days. However, there are many moving pieces that occur behind the scenes of an organization’s efforts to deliver products efficiently and on-time. The ability for customers to receive products is reliant on supply chains. This network delivers an end-to-end experience built on collaborative efforts between suppliers, manufacturers and third party logistics (3PL) providers.

According to Logistics Bureau,

The success of your business links inextricably to the performance of your supply chain.

In an article on supply chain management leadership, Forbes states that traditionally a supply chain would be used as a ‘reactive tool’. However, as they have evolved, they are now an important strategic initiative that spreads ‘value throughout the organization’.

The integration of a robust supply chain can benefit an organization in many ways, including the following:

  • Greater visibility
  • Enable an organization to cut costs
  • Influence ‘shareholder value
  • Increase customer satisfaction

There is no denying that a supply chain is an important vehicle when it comes to driving an organizations success. Let’s look at the hardships that may occur if a supply chain management strategy isn’t implemented.

Failure to Implement Supply Chains

As mentioned earlier, a survey conducted by Global Supply Chain Institute (GSCI), indicated an interesting disconnect. There were a considerable amount of companies that didn’t understand the function, purpose and benefit of a supply chain. A lack of awareness and failure to implement supply chain strategy, was also found to lead to poor performance. This ultimately resulted in a ‘performance gap’, which would impact the organization’s bottom line. In addition, it would also cause the organization to lack competitive advantage against other players in the industry.

The importance of implementing a supply chain goes beyond transporting product. It enables organizations to place their customers and bottom line, as a top priority. It also introduces efficiencies into the selling and exchange of goods. This reduces costs, keeps customers satisfied and generates revenue. It’s important that employees in leadership roles and across an entire organization, recognize the significant role a supply chain has in growing their organization.

Morai-Logistics-How-Mitigation-Strategies-Help-Global-Retailers-Offset-Supply-Chain-Shortages

Organizations within the retail industry should implement mitigation strategies into their supply chain to offset potential risks such as supply shortages.

In a press release published by Air Cargo News, global retail leader, Adidas, ‘turns to airfreight to mitigate supply chain shortages’. Reports from the first quarter showed that product shortages had impacted revenue. This caused the company to seek alternatives to their supply chain. In the case of Adidas, their chief financial officer stated that using airfreight will help ensure supply in the second quarter.

Omni-channel solutions are implemented by supply chains to help improve efficiencies and lower cost. By using a tactic that involves support from a variety of modes of transportation, supply chains are able to offer optimized solutions. However, the switch to airfreight made by Adidas is a mitigation strategy used to offset supply shortages. In addition to such shortages, there is a myriad of other consequences that may result from a lack of proper planning.

To combat an ever-changing global market place, research from the Global Journal of Flexible Systems Management, consider mitigation strategies to be highly important. When a retail company fails to set appropriate strategies to mitigate upstream barriers, there can be significant consequences to the bottom line. This article by Morai Logistics aims to identify four important components to an effective mitigation strategy.

Risk of Supply Shortage

The retail industry contributes significantly to the overall profit of the global economy. According to Statista, by 2020,  the global retail market will reach ‘28 trillion U.S. dollars’. Mitigation strategies become important when supply shortages begin to impact generated revenue. Research identifies a variety of barriers that can implicate the supply of a product, including:

  • Poor infrastructure
  • Shortage of skilled labour
  • Lower productivity of workers
  • Relationship management issues
  • Supply material defects

All of these barriers can cause major consequences to the bottom line. Therefore, creating appropriate mitigation strategies should be a top priority. They may not always be consistent depending on the risk(s) that directly impact a business or organization. Let’s explore two strategies that help mitigate risks within the retail and apparel industry.

Planning Efficiency

Research conducted on the impact of ‘supply-side’ barriers in global apparel supply chain’, identify planning to be an important strategy. This strategy specifically targets impacts from problems association with product planning.

Technology is playing a helpful role in enabling organizations and supply chains to design and create predictive tools. Morai Logistics has discussed the benefits of predictive analytics in foreseeing possible patterns in barriers that may arise. This is helpful when tactfully looking at dips in supply. In order to maintain transparency with customers and avoid harmful impacts from poor customer service, planning efficiency is important.

On-time delivery

Customer satisfaction should be a main focus when identifying and creating mitigation strategies. Customers are the main contributor to revenue into the business. Today’s global retail marketplace is reliant on both bricks and mortar and online shopping customers. On-time delivery has become an important focus for organizations looking for a competitive advantage. Therefore, making a commitment to meet lead-times will help maintain and improve customer satisfaction.

Supply chains must consider risk in order to take a proactive approach to avoiding consequences that may arise due to supply barriers. By outlining and implementing mitigation strategies, an organization can improve efficiencies, commit to on-time delivery and ensure complete customer satisfaction.

morai-logistics-blog-how-the-amazon-effect-impacts-supply-chains

As technology continues to grow at an unprecedented pace, organizations must optimize their supply chains to compete with the ‘Amazon Effect’.

The ‘Amazon Effect’ is a significant global movement that is shaping the way consumers buy and businesses sell. The term is linked to leading organization, Amazon, and the innovative and connected approach they take on selling goods worldwide. However, the disruption caused by this technological shift also impacts many industries, including supply chain and logistics.

According to Forbes Insights, the ‘Amazon Effect’ is one of four forces that will transform ‘logistics, supply chain and transportation’. The impact on supply chain stems from the rapid increase in consumer demand and output produced by online shopping. This requires the industry to take an innovative approach to the entire end-to-end journey of delivering a product to consumer fast and efficiently.

Technology has played an integral role in enabling supply chains to keep up with an ever changing global market place. In addition, an innovative and expert talent pool is also necessary to lead this industry into the future. However, there are hurdles and growing pains that come with any large scale change. This article by Morai Logistics discusses how the ‘Amazon Effect’ is shaping the supply chain and logistics industry. It also touches on effective strategies for change supply chains should implement to ensure organizations stay competitive and on top.

The Amazon Effect

The Internet and emerging technology platforms create endless opportunities for people to search and shop online. Last year, in 2018, ‘global e-retail sales’ generated USD 2.8 trillion. This number is forecasted to reach up to USD 4.8 trillion by 2021. In terms of the number of people expected to purchase product, there will be 2.14 billion global digital buyers by 2021. How do these figures relate to the ‘Amazon effect’?

According to Forbes, there has been a significant reduction in mall traffic over the years as a result of the convenience of online shopping. The article further emphasizes that purchasing products has also become ‘faster, easier and infinitely more convenient’. The ‘Amazon effect’ is a global phenomenon that is describes by Investopedia as,

The “Amazon effect” refers to the impact created by the online, e-commerce or digital marketplace on the traditional brick and mortar business model due to the change in shopping patterns, customer expectations and a new competitive landscape.

This causes an increase in pressure on retail companies to take a more innovative approach to selling at both the in-store and online level. However, there is also an incredible amount of demand on supply chains to meet these growing demands and expectations.

Supply Chain Impact

At the most basic level, supply chains enable the delivery of a good from point A to point B. From a retail perspective, this relationship is usually between a business and a customer. Between the fine lines, there is a cohesive interaction between manufacturers, shippers and possibly third party logistics providers (3PLs). However, what happens when a large increase in output occurs? According to Supply Chain and Demand Executive, supply chains that are ‘ill-equipped to administer efficient, high-volume production strategies’ suffer.

Strategies for Change

As online shoppers continue to seek companies that offer convenience and speed, supply chains must also integrate technologies that optimize their processes. Looking forward, supply chains must also evolve with external markets in order to remain competitive with the ‘Amazon effect’. In addition, there should be a focus on agility, efficiency, visibility, and end-to-end traceability. While the ‘Amazon effect’ is a disruptor, it also pushes organizations to think about the future and understand where the market is headed. By being aware of the growing expectations of customers, both retail and supply chains can thrive.

Utilizing-Smart-Sensors-Creates-Agile-and-Efficient-Supply-Chains

With 43% of supply chains using smart sensors, the industry must continue to integrate IoT tools to ensure efficiency and agility.

Last week, Morai Logistics presented the benefits of implementing smart manufacturing into supply chains. The integration of technology into factory level operations, ‘helps to create opportunities that improve efficiencies, productivity and operations on the ground floor’. By smartening up manufacturing, supply chains can ensure a high level of visibility across the shipment lifecycle. In addition, there is less reliance on manual shipment processes and more focus on automation.

If we trace smart manufacturing back to its root technology, we will find the Internet of Things (IoT). Industry experts have been integrating IoT theories and technologies into a variety of ‘machine to machine (M2M) communication’. Smart sensors, or instance is a new technology that is ‘supporting supply chain innovation and the smart factory’.

The global market share of smart sensors will grow to USD $21.5 billion by this year and USD $39 billion by 2022. Their advanced ability to uncover insightful information from data position smart sensors as a valuable technology tool to supply chains. In fact, 83% of supply chain leaders believe sensors, robotics and inventory optimization tools, are beneficial for competitive differentiation.

This week Morai Logistics will discuss how IoT technologies such as smart sensors, help the supply chain and logistics industry become more efficient and agile.

Smart Thinking with Smart Sensing

It was forecasted that by this year, the global IoT market will generate over USD $1.7 trillion. Statistic also show that the number of connected devices will be 20.35 billion. The Internet and technology continue to create opportunities for greater connection and communication. In order for supply chains to keep up with demand, supply chains must adopt and implement these tools.

There are many factors to consider when developing a comprehensive smart supply chain. The advancement toward smart manufacturing helps the industry develop efficiencies in operations and productivity. Furthermore, the use of smart technologies and tools is a huge part of smartening up the journey of products throughout the shipment life cycle.

Smart sensors, for instance, has the ability to harness complex data sets and translate them into actionable and insightful information. Sensors have been used to execute traditional operations, which included tracking orders and maintaining inventory. However, there are notable differences in new smart sensors. According to Deloitte,

Smart sensors are advanced platforms with onboard technologies such as microprocessors, storage, diagnostics, and connectivity tools that transform traditional feedback signals into true digital insights.

It’s an innovative way of extracting data to enable supply chains to make smarter decisions. Statistics show that 43% of supply chain leaders stated their companies ‘use sensor technology’. Furthermore, experts say that smart sensors enable ‘always-on supply chains’. By integrating smart technologies such as sensors, supply chains can benefit in many ways.

Benefits of Smart Sensors

To keep up with an upward movement in consumer demand and expectation, supply chains must look at current barriers. Common focus has been on improving visibility, productivity and operational efficiencies. Research shows that the integration of IoT technologies help in the following areas:

  • Efficiency
  • Responsiveness
  • Business Interuption

Smart sensors aid in collecting data and using it to help organizations with improved decision making. Furthermore, this enables management to reduce certain interferences that may include ‘missed handoffs, cold chain exceptions or theft’. The benefit of integrating smart sensors also includes ‘informed scenario-based contingency planning’. In addition, supply chains can improve their agility, ensure customer satisfaction and dodge unnecessary costs.

The Shift Toward a Demand Chain Model

Experts say demand-chain models are an effective solution for supply chains to meet the increased need for immediacy and improve the customer experience.

Today, consumers crave instant gratification when searching for products and services online. They want access to information and results in an immediate time frame, and this transcends throughout the buying funnel. It especially includes delivery. To meet consumer demands, there are high expectations on companies to offer same-day shipping options to their customers.

While companies work hard to get packages and goods to consumers efficiently, Forbes states,

…there comes a point where supply chain simply can’t get a package to you any faster.

This puts pressure on supply chains to evolve their strategies and execute efficient and effective solutions to meet these expectations. Distribution centers (DC) have been an integral component to a supply chain, and provide many benefits with respect to meeting these expectations. In 2017, the United States warehousing market, accounted for $148.7 billion. The total number of warehouses accounted reported in the same year was 17,353. There is a growing need for companies to expand their distribution capacity to meet the output requirements for consumers.

However, while expanding DC’s provides improved delivery solutions, experts believe a shift toward a holistic demand-chain would take it one step further. This article by Morai Logistics discusses the fundamentals of the demand-chain and the beneficial outcomes it could have as a supply chain model.

What’s a Demand-Chain?

According to Forbes, a demand-chain is ‘a state where production is localized and immediate’. It represents a shift from relying on centralized manufacturers, to autonomous machines. Supply Chain Market describes this migration as ‘the next generation in fulfillment’. It further responds to the extensive growth of ‘net economy’ or e-commerce, which has been fueling a high level of demand for immediacy.

To compete into this high-performance global market place, companies must follow a model that considers the following key metrics:

  • Product assortment
  • Fulfillment and execution
  • Visibility
  • Customer loyalty and retention

The overall added benefit of focusing on demand and pull, is that customers will get their products on demand. Simply put by Forbes, ‘there is a fast, on-demand creation of goods in the exact amount necessary’.

Top Reasons to Consider Demand

Demand-Chain models are a step toward meeting customer needs through the application of technology and demand-focused strategy. There are many reasons why this model is favourable for high-performance industries, such as supply chain and logistics.

Improves Customer Experience

Developing optimized solutions to improve on-time delivery and immediacy, has been primarily motivated by the objective of carrying out a positive customer experience. Thus, by improving visibility and leveraging technology to create more efficient modes of production and delivery, immediacy can be met.

Reduces Wasted Inventory

Businesses may run into various challenges when trying to produce and deliver large outputs, which can ultimately waste inventory. Possible reasons could be overproduction, delays or order defects. As a result, unnecessary inventory leads to a waste in product and money for the business. A demand-chain enables businesses to follow a just-in-time model where products are produced and delivered when needed.

Optimizes Order Fulfillment

Furthermore, a reduction in wasted inventory, a demand-chain model also aligns order fulfillment with delivery performance. When an organization can effectively understand the level of production required, they can better predict how to allocate resources to carry out the shipment life-cycle.

5 Ways RPA Optimizes Supply Chain Management

Robotic Process Automation (RPA) is an effective solution that helps improve efficiencies, reduce costs and optimize productivity.

Findings on the global RPA market, project a ‘Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of over 27%’ throughout 2013 to 2024. By 2024, this would amount to over 7, 000 Million (USD).

In a recent survey on RPA adoption, 17% of supply chain professionals believe RPA will be implemented in their organization’s by 2020. Furthermore, two thirds of respondents stated that their organization currently uses or are exploring this technology.

According to McKinsey & Company, RPA is defined as,

A type of software that mimics the activity of a human being in carrying out a task within a process.

Integrating this technology into any organization helps reduce human error and cost, while improving ROI and productivity. However, although skepticism exists in matters of replacing human jobs with automation, RPA actually provides many benefits to supply chains. Therefore, RPA is emerging as an effective technology for many industries, including supply chain and logistics.

This infographic by Morai Logistics outlines the top 5 ways RPA help improve supply chain management processes.

Robotic Process Automation: Supply Chain Optimization

morai-infographic-5-rpa-optimizes-supply-chain-management (3)

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? Interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider? Then don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news.