Morai-Logistics-Blog-Nintendo-Switch-Part-2

While modern companies focus on providing exceptional service, Nintendo continues to focus on extraordinary products with a Customer-Centric approach.

In our last post, we began exploring the reasons behind Nintendo’s history of not meeting consumer demand. Many of its gaming consoles, software, peripherals and promotional items in the last 20 years have seen instances of scarcity across its North American and European markets. Limited supply, inflated grey market prices, and angry consumers have been the result.

Nintendo’s latest console, the Switch, launched a few months ago with similar supply shortages. Some customers and press accused the company of intentionally limiting production to drive sales given the familiarity of the situation.

What’s behind the latest supply issues is the company’s customer-centric philosophy, not artificial scarcity.

Artificial Scarcity Isn’t the Problem

On the surface, Nintendo’s selling practices may seem to favour artificial scarcity to drive sales. The problem with this theory, is that artificial scarcity is only ever a short-term solution for luxury products. Artificial scarcity only generates demand because of perceived scarcity. The actual value of the product isn’t considered, meaning that the company doing it has little incentive to innovate the product. After a certain point, and despite a company’s attempts, there will be too much of a product in circulation for it to maintain its price.

Nintendo is a nearly 140-year-old multi-national company, iconic and influential in its industry. If it followed the same strategy as the former Beanie Baby empire, it would’ve folded decades ago.

The ‘problem’ with Nintendo’s management and supply chain strategies, is that they’re very customer-centric.

Customer-Centric: An Old but Effective Model for Nintendo

Newcomers like Amazon, Uber and PayPal have been disruptive to many industries. However, their biggest contribution is the latest trend of customer-focused strategies. Many companies are now trying to streamline their services to better improve the customer experience.

Ken Ramoutar of Avanade Insights, highlights what a customer-centric focus involves:

  • Anticipate your future needs looking at behavioural patterns, market trends, leveraging data from inside and outside the organization
  • A unique and memorable experience; seamless across your interaction channels
  • Analytics to inspect call logs and problem reports to feed changes in supply and production

None of these describe Nintendo’s business practices or product design philosophy. In fact, the company is notorious for being especially conservative in an industry that’s in constant flux.

Nintendo and Unique Gaming Experiences

Nintendo’s focus throughout its long history, is on creating products that provide a unique experience in and of themselves. Unlike its past (Sega) and current competitors (Sony and Microsoft), the company never bothered to chase the latest technological, marketing or business trends. This historically had both good and bad results for the company at different points in its history. However, it has allowed it to remain strong in the face of ever ballooning industry costs. Sony and Microsoft may have millions of dollars to throw behind their development and marketing strategies, but Nintendo has its Blue Ocean Strategy.

That’s it for this week’s post. In the final entry of this three-part series, we’ll describe how Nintendo’s Blue Ocean Strategy and customer-centric approach has led it to continue to be a dominating force within its industry.

If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news.

Morai-Logistics-Blog-Nintendo-Switch

Beloved entertainment giant Nintendo has a long history of trouble getting their products to the right hands.

Almost two months ago, video game giant Nintendo released its latest console—the Switch. Although it received a lot of positive coverage, a familiar problem has been marring the consumer goodwill; extreme product scarcity.

The company’s sales forecasts were off. They were so off that additional Switch consoles had to be flown to their North American and European distributors. Although Nintendo took a drastic action and its been two months since the launch, the consoles are still hard to find. Some are even claiming that it’s a case of artificial scarcity.

Before we can begin to answer the question of Nintendo’s possible motives, there’s a few basics that need to be gone over.

Make it Rare, Make it Wanted

The scarcity of a commodity or a service is an important element of the business model. If there’s a lack of supply, the price will likely go up. If there’s overproduction, the price will start going down. While scarcity is a natural and fundamental part of a free market, artificial scarcity is not.

Artificial scarcity happens when an individual, company or organization creates a scarcity either through technology, production or law, where there would otherwise be the capacity for an abundance.

A classic example would be the Beanie Babies during the 90s. Ty Warner, the person behind the craze, “would retire specific animals at whim, creating scarcity in the market and inspiring collectors to pay up to $5,000 for a plush toy that originally retailed for $5” writes New York Post contributor, Larry Getlen:

Ty’s website further fueled the phenomenon, as the company used it to make retirement announcements and to speculate on possible retirements, dropping hints that drove collectors to buy or sell different lines. Some sellers even began changing prices throughout the day based on website updates

In the end, the Beanie Baby empire came crashing down. Collectors became overwhelmed by all the new product lines and regular customers got tired of fighting with scalpers. The rise and fall of Beanie Babies is a lesson in how even the hottest products can tank if consumers aren’t respected.

Nintendo Has a History of Underestimating Demand

While misjudging demand is something many businesses go through, Nintendo is a special case. Pretty much every piece of hardware released by the company has met with supply problems.
Just to list a few, here are some examples:

  • NES Classic Mini. Retailed for $60 USD, now on Ebay for $250+ and climbing.
  • Amiibos, RFID-enabled collectable gaming peripherals originally sold for $12.99. Some of harder to find ones ended up selling on the grey market for over $100 USD.
  • New 3DS XLs were impossible to get a hold in NYC when they released earlier this year according to an article from The Verge.

Just from these examples (there are many more), it’s safe to say that the company has a history of seriously understating the demand for it’s products. Many potential customers are turned-off from buying Nintendo products for this very reason.

Is it a problem with Nintendo’s supply chain or management? What if the problem is intentional, the supply intentionally restricted as many consumers suspect? The answer to these questions require nuance which is why we’ll leave off answering them until the next blog post. Check back again soon for the second part of this two-part topic.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news.

Earlier this month, Research and Markets added to their “Third Party Logistics (3PL) Market Analysis By Service, By Transport (Roadways, Railways, Waterways, Airways), By End-Use (Manufacturing, Retail, Healthcare, Automotive), By Region, And Segment Forecasts, 2014 – 2025” report.

Experts are estimating the 3PL market to reach USD $1.24 trillion within the next decade. That’s a massive increase considering that the current market is estimated to sit at USD 721 billion according to Armstrong & Associates, Inc. There are eight reasons why this is the case. That’s why this month we thought we’d focus our infographic on the top market growth predictions for 2025 when it comes to the third-party logistics industry.

Third-Partly Logistics Market Growth Predition for 2025

morai-logistics-infographic-8-3pl-market-growth-predictions-2025

As business around the globe continue to expand their operations, the 3PL market will continue to parallel its growth. The Research and Markets updates highlight how this will affect revenue and coverage. Overall, it looks like the next few years will be a good time for the 3PL market.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news.

Morai-Logistics-Blog-international-womens-day-logistics

Yesterday was International Women’s Day (IWD), a celebration and tribute to women’s rights. This year marked the 108th anniversary of IWD.

IWD 2017’s goal is to speed up the timeline in reaching parity between men and women in opportunity, wages and leadership representation. According to the World Economic Forum, it’ll be nearly 170 years before the gender gap is closed. That’s a long time to wait for equality.

Let’s have a look at how far women have come. Both in the workplace and in field of logistics.

Women Internationally

Women have made tremendous progress across the globe in terms of rights and in the workforce. However, the last few years haven’t been as promising.

Despite an additional quarter billion women entering the workforce since 2006, women are a third less likely to participate than a man. In fact, in the ten years between 1995 and 2015, globally, women’s labour force participation dropped over 2%. Representation in administrative roles isn’t much better as women only hold 12% of the world’s board seats according to a report by Deliotte.

The disparity continues in wages. Globally, women earn around a third less than what men earn.

Women in North America

The numbers are a little more optimistic if you narrow the scope to just North America.

In Canada and the U.S for example, the difference between the number of men and women in the workforce was 9.6% and 12.4% respectively.

The two countries show very different numbers when it comes to women in management positions. Women hold around 35% of management and professional roles in Canada, whereas in the U.S, the number goes up to 51%.

Only modest gains have in regards to the number of women serving as Fortune 500 CEO’s. There’s only 24 women (4.8%) in the top levels of these companies. However, Fortune is reporting that the number is increasing to 27 by the end of first quarter 2017. While still low, these numbers are big improvement over 20 years ago, when women were completely absent from these positions.

Women in Logistics

The logistics industry continues to struggle with equality. There are several reasons for this, but a root cause is perception. It’s hard for the industry to escape the perception that it’s all about heavy lifting and moving. This image problem has affected the number of women seeking out a career in logistics.

Currently, around 65% of graduates going into the logistics field are male. Only 35% of graduates are female. The difference is the greatest of any business field. The number drops to 5% when looking at women in logistics holding top level positions.

These figures are troubling not just from an equality perspective, but from a business point of view as well. Financial performance significantly improves if there’s at least 30% women in higher-level leadership positions according to a 2009 report by McKinsey.

Women have come a long way since the first IWD 108 years ago. Organizations are increasingly seeing the value of having qualified women on their teams, from entry-level to CEO positions. The logistics industry especially has a lot of work left. But, we’re confident that as the industry continues to modernize, the number of female leaders will grow as well.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news.

Morai-Logistics-Blog-infographic-transparency-supply-chain

Transparency has been the promise of many CEOs and businesses in recent years. That’s for good reason, customers want to know where the products and the parts came from.

“Consumers, governments, and companies are demanding details about the systems and sources that deliver the goods. They worry about quality, safety, ethics, and environmental impact” writes University of Oxford’s Saïd Business School professor Steve New, in the Harvard Business Review.

However, ethics isn’t the only reason that a logistics provider should commit to a transparent supply chain. The benefits of transparency affect consumers, but it also has a positive impact on how a company does business and the operation of the company itself.

Infographic: How Improving Transparency is Beneficial to Your Supply Chain

morai-logistics-infographic-transparency-in-supply-chain

Several studies indicate that transparency is an asset. What many don’t realize is that it goes beyond marketing. Transparency helps your business on three levels: with consumers, with business, and with every day operations.

Making a supply chain entirely transparent takes work and commitment. However, the result is a net benefit for all involved.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news.

Morai-Logistics-Blog-TPP-NAFTA-2

Earlier this week, newly inaugurated president Donald J. Trump withdraws from the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). Hence, the U.S withdrawal from the 12-country agreement effectively rendered seven years of negotiations a waste.

Pulling the U.S out of TPP was one of Trump’s campaign promises. Though, aside from the possible global-political ramifications of the action, what many are wondering now is if he’ll do the same to NAFTA and what all this will mean for the logistics industry.

Consequences of the Withdrawal

To say TPP was controversial would be an understatement. Several protests around the world were held throughout the negotiations.

There are many reasons for and against TPP, with both sides passionate about their position. But, the trade agreement would have created a network encompassing 40% of all world trade and affected millions of people across the world. Other global concerns would’ve been impacted as well, including cyber security, environmentalism and free trade.

Fallout of the withdrawal is being hotly debated across the professional and media landscape. So we have detailed the three key concerns that are being discussed:

  • Loss of North American competitiveness — TPP would’ve eliminated more than 18,000 taxes and trade barriers across its member countries. By pulling out of the trade agreement, the U.S and by extension Canada, is losing out on a large section of the global market. Farming manufacturing, and the services and technology sectors will be impacted the most. While Canada and Mexico can still negotiate on their own, they lose a lot of bargaining power without U.S backing.
  • Loss of North American influence over global trade — One notable absence from TPP was China. Some experts theorized the exclusion was intentional. TPP they argue, was an attempt to counter China’s growing economic influence on global trade. China has pushed its own trade pact, called the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP), which currently has 16 members. By backing out of TPP, Trump may’ve pushed some countries that originally signed to seek other trade agreements, like RCEP.
  • Risk of protectionism — The U.S is not part of the RCEP. If it goes through, experts are worried that it will have tariffs against the U.S. This, along with the shaken confidence of TPP members may raise the number and cost of tariffs.

What Will Happen with NAFTA?

Trump promised Americans to either renegotiate or outright end NAFTA during his campaign. His actions with TPP indicate he’s serious about his promise.

When asked on Monday, White House press secretary Sean Spicer said Trump would rather renegotiate NAFTA rather than tear it up.

“Mr. Spicer said Mr. Trump’s complaint is with “multinational” trade deals because they are more complicated to renegotiate. But he said the President was open to bilateral deals – a sign that he might be willing to keep a deal with Canada, even if he makes good on his pledge to change the terms of NAFTA to make it harder for American companies to move to Mexico” wrote Adrian Morrow, reporter for the Globe and Mail.

Trump will be meeting with Prime Minister Trudeau and Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto in the coming weeks to discuss a renegotiation.

If NAFTA were to end, it would have serious negative repercussions for the transportation, manufacturing and logistics industries across the three nations.

The end of TPP is already having an impact on offshoring efforts. Thus, the coming weeks will see if nearshoring efforts will be upturned as well.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news.

morai-logistics-blog-supermarket-amazon-go

In last week’s post, we covered the reveal of Amazon Go.

This week, we’ll cover the steps Amazon’s competitors have taken to stay competitive. We will also be going into why with just a teaser video, Amazon may have already won the war for the future of retail.

Before we begin, we need to do a recap about what we know so far.

What the Reveal Video Tells Us

Amazon Go will work like this:

  • Amazon Go aims to give customers a ‘grab and go’ feeling similar to how its digital shop operates.
  • You enter the store by waving your smart phone across a scanner.
  • You will need an Amazon account (likely Amazon Prime) to use the store.
  • If a customer changes their mind about an item, he/she just puts it back.
  • The store will be using AI and facial recognition technology similar to that found in a self-driving car.
  • Seattle will be the first test city which makes sense given the city is also home to Amazon’s head office.

The video is meant to cement the idea of a friction-less retail experience. Simply go in, get what you want, then leave. The video makes the idea believable, influences buyer expectation, and affects the future of the industry.

Let’s look at the strategies Amazon’s competitor’s have been testing to expand their market share.

Competitor Response

Big retail and food companies are using a number of different strategies to stay competitive. Companies such as RetailNext, Euclid, Nomi and others are part of a trend that provides brick-and-mortar stores with analytics that looks similar to website traffic reports. The aggregate data is used to project purchasing trends, decide how to build a layout, and produce more detailed reports for shareholders.

Food heavyweights such as Tyson Foods Inc., Campbell Soup Co. and Hershey are taking a page from UberEATS with their strategy. They are trying to get into the home delivery and meal kit market as Wall Street Journal correspondent Kelsey Gee explains. They are working with online couriers to challenge companies like Blue Apron and HelloFresh that have carved out a $1.5billion market delivering parcels of fresh ingredients.

Wal-Mart is also making an aggressive push into online groceries. Wal-Mart Pickup and Fuel lets customers order their items online and pick them up when they are ready.

Future of Retail—Has Amazon Already Won?

While the strategies used by Amazon’s competitors are innovative, they haven’t had the same media buzz. With just a video, Amazon has created an expectation amongst consumers. They will expect greater convenience in the way the video promised. Companies using alternative models will need to work harder to convince their consumers that their way is superior.

However, being king of retail may not be Amazon’s true goal. Amazon Go is more likely to be a proof-of-concept and a retail model it can sell to other businesses as this video speculates.

Conclusion

The reveal of Amazon Go is recent, but it’s already beginning to disrupt the retail industry. Time will tell which new retail method becomes the standard, but one thing is certain—retail will be undergoing a drastic evolution very soon.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news.

morai-logistics-blog-supermarket-amazon-go

A couple of weeks ago, Amazon.com Inc. announced it will be opening a grocery store. This is an unexpected move for the e-commerce giant.

Amazon Go is the name of the name program. The reveal video promises “no lines, no checkouts, no registers”. It’s about to enter the pilot phase, being limited to a single store. The only customers to test it out will be employees.

So why the hype?

More Than Meets the Eye

It might seem strange that the announcement of physical store is having such an effect on news outlets. After all, e-commerce sales continue to grow each year. The sale of groceries isn’t new for the company as its AmazonFresh program made its debut back in 2007. This being Amazon however, means the project is more nuanced then it first appear.

A 2014 patent filed by Amazon gives more insight into how the store could work. Basically it involves a whole lot of cameras, sensors and tracking. Natt Garun, from the Verge, comments:

The patent describes a system where cameras could capture you as you walk into the store, then identify who you are based on an ID card that’s associated with your Amazon client

There are cameras lined within the store as well. They’d determine if multiples of the same items are taken. So if you took several bags of chips to get to one in the back and you put the rest back, then the cameras would recognize the action and keep you from being charged.

Sensors in the shelves are another way for the store to know what you have taken. They will check to see if the weight has changed from its original state.

Why Invest in a Grocery Store?

There are some unique ways Amazon Go stands to benefit the company.

Amazon Go, even if it were expanded far and wide, would generate a shadow of the sales of the parent company. E-commerce will have the advantage over physical stores because it isn’t limited by the geography of its customers.

What Amazon Go represents for the company, is valuable information on its customer’s buying habits. Customers would be enticed by the promise of a hassle-free grocery experience, and the cameras in the store would collect information about them. Nat Garun continues:

The patent says this is used to identify the shopper’s hand to see whether they actually pick up anything off a shelf, but combine that with the fact that Amazon knows what you’re buying and who you are down to your skin colour and this is pretty next-level market data

Information gathered this way could be used to strengthen its other programs, AmazonFresh in particular. The company would be able to see what works to move a product and what doesn’t. Having physical stores would also allow Amazon to broaden its influence in the retail market.

Conclusion

Time will tell how much of a disruption Amazon Go will be on the industry. The promise of “no lines, no checkouts, no registers” sounds appealing but customers may not like being always watched.

The store will also be a model for other industries to consider. In the same way the reveal of Amazon Prime Air made waves in 2013, the same will be true for Amazon Go.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news.

morai-logistics-blog-santa-ecommerce

eCommerce operations is the true Santa’s workshop and its logistics and supply chain professionals that scramble during the holiday season to make sure that your gifts and goodies arrive just in time for the holidays!

Most people are readying themselves and their bellies for the holidays, logistic providers are readying themselves as well. eCommerce businesses in particular, started preparing for the holidays back in August. Although Black Friday and Cyber Monday are behind them, there is still Christmas Day and Boxing Day still looming later this month.

Right now, operation teams across North America are making their lists (of inventory and personnel) and checking it twice (and several more times for good measure). Thanks to Black Friday and Cyber Monday they’ve found out which retailers and shippers are naughty or nice. This is because when the holidays come, customer shipments are comin’ to town (every town)!

Getting the Workshops Ready

According to a recent Wall Street Journal Logistics Report written by Loretta Chao, Transportation and warehouse companies added about 8,900 jobs across the U.S in November.

The number of warehouse operator jobs grew by 3,100 jobs from October to November. Payrolls have also increased as its grown by 47,000 jobs over the past 12 months.

It wasn’t only fulfillment centers that saw an influx of newly hired associates. As Chao points out,

Courier and messenger companies, including the package carriers that deliver online orders, increased their payrolls by 5,700 jobs last month, expanding employment in the industry by some 26,300 jobs from a year ago, according to the U.S. Department of Labor jobs report. The gain followed the addition of 12,200 transport and logistics jobs in October

Big Business in Gift Giving

The reason the holidays are such a scramble for retailers is because of the amount of business they stand to gain. In the U.S alone, the holiday season generated over three trillion dollars for the retain industry in 2013. The holiday sales accounted for 19.2% of retail total sales that year.

Increasingly, people are turning to online shopping. In terms of numbers, by 2010 B2C ecommerce sales totaled $283 billion USD in North America. By this year’s end, ecommerce sales are predicted to reach nearly $600 billion according to Statista.com.

In 2015, the holidays season saw desktop retail e-commerce spending in the U.S reach over $56 billion USD. Most of that money was spent online on Cyber Monday.

Cost of Late Deliveries

Understandably, customers will be upset if the items they ordered online don’t arrive on time. The main draw of purchasing gifts online is the promise of convenient and speedy delivery after all. Failing to hit deadlines means not just having angry customers, but also losing their trust when they need to do their holiday shopping in the future.

The holiday season of 2013 is the worst example of this. A shortened holiday season and erratic weather were cited as the reason for delays, but the damage was done. Customers were angry. It took costly good will gestures to regain their trust.

As 2016 ends, remember all the people that helped make your holiday special. Receiving gifts is great, but more amazing is the gift’s journey and the people around you!

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news.

morai-logistics-blog-blockchain-logistics

The Port of Rotterdam tests blockchain logistics which can kickstart a revolution in the level of transparency within the industry.

The Port of Rotterdam, Europe’s largest shipping port, is taking part in a Blockchain consortium which is focusing on logistics, reported Coin Desk. The project has the support of more than fifteen public and private sector companies based in the Netherlands.

Consortium members will spend the next two years designing and developing applications for blockchain technology in the logistics sector. There have been similar efforts in the past, but according to the founders, this blockchain project is unique because of its scale in the logistics chain.

What is Blockchain Technology?

According to the Economist, a blockchain is a distributed database that maintains an ever-growing list of records called blocks. The information in a block cannot be altered retrospectively as each block contains a timestamp and a link to a previous block. The nature of blockchains makes it function like a public, digital, distributed ‘ledger’.

The technology is relatively recent having first been put into practice by Satoshi Nakamoto in 2009 as a core component for the digital currency known as bitcoins.

Since its debut, blockchain technology has had a disruptive impact on several industries. Financial technology was the first to start adopting blockchains, but its started to move into the logistics sector as well.

How Blockchain Technology Can Benefit Logistics

There have been several articles published online about the benefits blockchain technology can bring to the logistics and supply chain sector. Here are a few ways the technology can improve the industry.

  • Transparency for customers. For most people, little is known about the products they use. As LetsTalkPayment.com phrases it, “an almost incomprehensible network of retailers, distributors, transporters, storage facilities and suppliers stand between us and the products we use.”

    With blockchain technology, customers will be able to see every part of the journey their product took before arriving in their hands. The network behind the store shelf will no longer be hidden, allowing the customer to make better informed decisions.

  • Transparency for auditors. Because the history of transactions is locked into each block, auditors will have an easier time understanding where items and resources have gone. This, as Adam Robinson of Cersasis puts it, “help[s] supply chain leadership, such as C-level executives understand how to make the supply chain more efficient and productive.”
  • Greater security. The technology will enable supply chain companies to identify attempted fraud more easily.

    “For example, an employee that goes into the system to change past events will alter the coding of the event” writes Robinson. “However, the altered coding appears so differently that it would be practically impossible to not notice the change. This will allow companies to recognize the fraud and who initiated the change almost immediately.”

The two-year project undertaken by Port of Rotterdam will give insight into the scope of the benefits, but the technology has already shown promise.

“With a world that is becoming more connected on a daily basis, blockchain technology will inherently develop into a symbiotic relationship with the Internet of Things and today’s advanced logistics and supply chain management systems” concludes Robinson.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news.