Morai-Logistics-Jet-Amazon

Ever since Amazon made it big on the e-commerce market over 20 years, there have been countless competitors, start ups, and imitators that have tried to take a piece of the trillion dollar plus pie.

Enter Jet.com, a new start-up by Marc Lore (former founder of Diapers.com) which aims to be a blend of Costco and Amazon. Costco with its membership benefits, and Amazon with its selection of goods.

What is Jet?

Jet.com is the brain child of Marc Lore, who has something of a history with Amazon. Prior to Jet, Lore was the co-founder of Quidsi, the parent company of a family of websites as Diapers.com and Soap.com. In 2011, the company was sold to Amazon for whopping $545 million. After the sale, Lore worked for Amazon for two years before heading for other pastures.

Lore’s goal for the budding company is ambitious. Jet is projected to incur heavy losses until 2020, by which point Lore expects the company to sell $20 billion worth of products annually “ a threshold he expects to hit by 2020. Only Amazon, eBay Inc. and Apple Inc. have higher online “gross merchandise volume” in the U.S”, writes this Wall Street Journal article, quoting analyst Matt Nemer:

Membership fees will be Jet’s sole source of profits, since it says it will relentlessly undercut rivals on product prices and offer free shipping on orders of more than $35 and free returns. Overhead expenses alone are expected to climb to about $150 million a year

As for Jet.com business model, it requires a $50 annual membership. With it, customers would be able to buy diapers, cleaning supplies, sporting goods and more.

This article on CNNMoney goes into detail as to what the service offers and doesn’t yet offer:

  • It costs $50 a year to join. That’s slightly less than a Costco membership, and half the price of Amazon Prime.
  • Like Amazon and Costco, Jet allows individual retailers to sell products through its platform.
  • You can buy anything from groceries and appliances to furniture, books, clothing, and gadgets on Jet.
  • On average, Jet says you can expect to save $150 per year.
  • Discounts are applied based on a few factors.
  • Shipping and 30-day returns are free for orders over $35..
  • Deliveries arrive in two to five business days
  • Jet currently doesn’t offer same-day delivery service.
  • Jet offers a rewards program
  • Jet will only serve customers in the U.S.

Although Jet has incurred heavy losses, and projects to continue incurring heavy losses, it has still managed to obtain the highest valuation ever among e-commerce start ups according to an article in the Wall Street Journal. At the time of writing this article, Jet has managed to raise $225 million in capital.

Jet’s Projected Path to Success is Not Without Obstacles

Of the 10 million products listed on their, only 25,00 are from Jet’s own warehouses. The rest of the items are bought from other companies and then shipped directly to the customer, which is expensive for Jet as it often ends up paying high shipping costs plus any difference between its advertised price and the amount charged by the outside website.

Also, it’s business plan to undercut all its competitors is something to be cautious about as even e-commerce giant Amazon with all its volume, generally loses money.

Despite these barriers, its hard not to get excited about what Jet promises to customers. Who doesn’t want cheaper goods?

The articles linked to in this post admit that there are already things about Jet that should at least give way to at least cautious optimism about the company.

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Morai-Logistics-Jurassic-Park

Source: Forbes

The long awaited Jurassic World (the latest installment in the Jurassic Park film series) opened last Friday to generally favorable reviews from both critics and audiences. The consensus among both groups is that although it lacks the inventiveness and imagination of the original, the spectacle of seeing 65 million year old creatures revived on the screen provides the thrills to make the film worth watching.

As this is a blog about logistics, we’d like to focus on one of the most interesting parts of the series (other than the dinosaurs of course). How would such a place need to operate to turn a profit?

Twitter Gets on the Case

Back in November when a teaser trailer was released for Jurassic World, two friends used the Twitter hashtag #realjurassicparkproblems to call out some (hilarious) barriers an actual Jurassic Park would encounter. What followed was that the hashtag exploded into a popular meme on the social media platform as more and more people started using it as well, including real life paleontologists who also joined in on the fun.

Here are some of tweets:

“We have all the problems of a major theme park and a major zoo”

This line by Ray Arnold in the original Jurassic Park summed up the basic problem that a real life Jurassic park would face (other than the impossibility of resurrecting creatures long extinct).

At 30,500 acres (approximately the same size as San Francisco), and with an annual attendance of over 55 million, the Walt Disney World Resort is the closest real world equivalent to the theme park side of a real Jurassic Park.

Both the day to day and annual logistical hurdles for the smooth operation of the Walt Disney World Resort are extensive as a then-Walt Disney World president Al Weiss revealed in a 2004 Orlando Sentinel article. Some of the details he mentioned were:

  • More than 5,000 cast members are dedicated to maintenance and engineering, including 750 horticulturists and 600 painters.
  • Disney spends more than $100 million every year on maintenance at the Magic Kingdom. In 2003, $6 million was spent on renovating its Crystal Palace restaurant.
  • The streets in the parks are steam cleaned every night.
  • There are cast members permanently assigned to painting the antique carousel horses; they use genuine gold leaf.
  • There is a tree farm on site so that when a mature tree needs to be replaced, a thirty-year-old tree will be available to replace it.

Given that the movies, Jurassic Park is set on the fictional Isla Nublar, an isolated islet located near Costa Rica, the park would have the extra logistical problem of transporting supplies by sea which can have its own obstacles in itself.

The other logistics problem the park would face is with the animals themselves. Nevermind the massive budget it would need to even create and maintain the technology needed create the technology needed to produce the creatures in the first place, it would also effective logistical management to take proper care of the creatures.

Chesterzoo.org explains the barrier when discussing modern zoos,

Record keeping is essential for effective management, particularly when considering the many different species in a zoological collection, and the need for consistent monitoring of individual health, welfare, breeding and mortality. It is therefore vital that all animals are individually recognisable (e.g. markings, features, tags) and permanently identifiable (micro-chips)

Now imagine that level of record keeping and the cost of specialized personnel required to take care of creatures so “exotic” that the Earth has not seen their kind since the late Cretaceous.

That’s a logistics management position we wouldn’t envy…

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Morai-Logistics-Blog-3D-Printing

Last week, Frost & Sullivan published the 2015 Supply Chain Foresight report which analyzed key megatrends impacting (or predicted to impact) industry stakeholders. More importantly, the survey
A key point of the survey was that the findings were based on how the industry leaders who participated felt about the impact (or possibility of impact) the emerging megatrends would have on their supply chains, businesses and industries.

3D/4D printing and copying was given a low ranking, whereas technology innovation, the rise of African and Asian economies, device connectivity and big data, e-commerce and robotics were cited as the most pressing megatrends.

In our view, the assessment and ranking of the emerging megatrends by the study’s participants isn’t incorrect. However, we feel that it lacks some imagination and that the full implications of this technology is not being fully appreciated from a supply chain and logistics perspective.

3D/4D Printing’s Effect on Manufacturing & Transportation

One of the many appeals of the potential of 3D/4D printing as a technology is that if it were to continue its drop in price, it would then be financially feasible to incorporate into a manufacturing facility in mass. Such an action could effectively localize the entire production process, affecting the transportation and manufacturing sectors in profound ways.

“While manufacturers benefit from the operational efficiencies 3D printing can bring, transportation providers may take a revenue hit if they aren’t fully prepared. Global commercial transportation lanes are particularly at risk since more products will be manufactured locally. A recent analysis found that as much as 41 percent of air cargo business and 37 percent of ocean container business may be affected. About 25 percent of over-the-road (OTR) trucking business is also at risk, due to the potential reduction in goods that start as air cargo or as containers on ships” says an article from Load Delivered (quoting statistics from Strategy&).

3D/4D Printing as it is today

Although it is likely that it’ll be several years before the potential for 3D/4D printing to be fully realized, the technology has however resulted in logistical innovations.
The militaries of Britain, America, and China have already started using 3D printing on the field to replace equipment parts, and to print out surgical instruments and protective masks directly in war zones.

NASA has also experimented with 3D printing as an economical alternative to sending tools and spare parts into space to fix delicate equipment. Rather than using the limited space in a shuttle to transport a wrench to use on the International Space Station, NASA can simply email and print the wench on the station itself.

Other Implications of 3D Printing

The problem with trying to list all the ways that this technology will affect the supply side logistics industry is that the far reaching implications, consequences, and innovations it affords is mostly uncharted territory as there’s nothing like it. It’s ability to collapse the space of manufacturing and transportation of goods is similar to the automobile and will potentially have just as great as an impact on the industry overall.

As mentioned, although the far reaching implications of this technology is murky at best, there are some implications that are generally agreed upon . According to an article on Manufacturing Global Magazine, they are the following:

  • Easier prototyping
  • Easier customisation
  • Greater creativity and efficiency
  • Improved consistency
  • Reduced lead times
  • Lower prices

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news!

In recent years, the growing trend with many U.S. companies has been to relocate some or even all of their off-shore production back to North America. China no longer holds the sway that it used to, but countries such as Mexico are quickly becoming the much more attractive option. Here are 12 reasons why you should consider near shoring in Mexico.

The Right Time to Consider Nearshoring Strategies to Mexico

morai-logistics-12-reasons-to-invest-in-mexican-nearshoring

As foreign investment in China stalls, Mexico’s foreign investment continues to grow. As a result, demand for facilities and land is beginning to drive up. Thus, the best time to invest in Mexico for your manufacturing or sourcing potential for your organization is now.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news!

Morai-Logistics-Blog-Nepal

Recently, Nepal has been hit by a second major earthquake in less than three weeks. It had 7.3-magnitude and it killed 65 people and more than 1,200 injured.

The human cost in lives and injuries is hard to calculate at the moment, but between this new earthquake and the April 25th earthquake (7.8-magnitude) just a couple of weeks prior, the estimated death toll is currently over 8,065 with over 19,200 injured. These causalities don’t take into account those killed in the adjoining areas of Nepal, or by the subsequent avalanches it triggered on Mount Everest and in the Lantang Valley.

As catastrophic as the two earthquakes have been on human life, Nepal’s pre-disaster limited infrastructure means that recovery and aid for the afflicted groups in the area could in fact take weeks to years for some of the more isolated communities.

In an interview with the Wall Street Journal, Alex Marianelli, senior logistics officer for Asia at the United Nations World Food Program and one of the directors of the effort that is bringing medicine, food and other supplies to the battered, impoverished nation, had this to say “Logistically, this particular disaster—because of the geography and the mountainous terrain and poor roads—is probably the most difficult response I have ever had to implement”.

Other issues that have hindered aid groups and relief supply chains are the country’s customs requirements, congestion, and transportation difficulties.

The Nepal Crisis

The Nepali government wanted to tax the relief materials like ordinary goods which in turn has led to Nepalis expressing doubt as to the effectiveness of the government in sending aid where it’s most needed.

The country only has one airport in Katmandu that can handle the larger aircraft needed by relief groups. However strict weight restrictions and the capital’s 4,600-foot elevation and relatively short runway make landings difficult.

Both UPS and FedEx Corp. have committed resources to helping Nepal. UPS has announced that it would give $500,000 to aid which in combination with in-kind support to enable the provision of urgent relief supplies, as well as potential on-the-ground logistics support for long-term recovery needs. FedEx’s announced support was for approximately $1 million in cash, transportation support and a chartered flight to deliver critical medical aid and supplies to Nepal.

There had been some progress in alleviated Nepal’s most affected areas as several international bodies (both public and private) were working on more long term solutions which would’ve addressed the country’s unique geographic situation. However, yesterday’s earthquake has put that work into question.

Thousands died in the initial April earthquale. Hundreds of thousands more were left homeless, and centuries-old buildings were destroyed at UNESCO World Heritage sites in the Kathmandu. The new earthquake only added to the misery and will stretch already thinned supply lines even further as things begin to settle.

After the initial search and rescue operations, focus will shift toward shelter, water, and medical supplies. Hopefully, the logistics of the situation can improved soon as food is already an urgent need for many thousands in the country, and it’ll become even more pressing once the heavy rains start and new area fall victim to avalanches.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news!

Morai-Logistics-Blog-Pan-Am

With over 10,000 athletes from 41 different nations competing in 36 different sports, the 2015 Pan Am Games (TO2015) which are set to take place in Toronto, are looking to be a big win for Canada this summer.

Although the Pan Am Games is impressive in its own right as a major international sporting event, it is also something of a minor logistics marvel.

Aside from the numbers mentioned earlier, the organizers of this year’s event need to also take into account that over 250,000 visitors and media personal will be attending the event. More than 30 venues in and around the city of Toronto will host the main event with an additional be 13 non-competition venues and 15 training sites for the athletes. Because of the major logistics demand this will entail, the 2015 Pan Am Games teamed up with Schenker of Canada, an international logistics company.

DB Schenker has pledged to provide 6,968 square metres (75,000 square feet) of warehouse space, warehouse operations (including staff and equipment), freight transportation and freight distribution operations, venue and Athletes’ Village logistics operations, as well as customs clearance and freight forwarding according to an earlier press release.

In fact, DB Schenker has estimated that 2015 Pan Am Games will require twice the number of products used during the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games.

A Fully Stocked Event

In a bit of creative and proud self-promotion, DB Schenker posted a list of the items they’d be providing for the event–back in 2013. The intent being to market themselves as the official logistics support for the event. Here is the highlights of that list:

  • 1,000,000 items with 5,000 stock-keeping units (SKUs) to keep track of them in the warehouse
  • 6,250 folding tables (stretched end to end would run the entire length of the Pan Am equestrian cross-country course)
  • 22,500 folding chairs (the equivalent of 12 fully loaded 16-metre tractor trailers)
  • 7,500 metres (25,000 feet) of barrier tape (almost 14 times the height of the CN Tower)
  • 7,600 beds and mattresses
  • 950 pairs of track spikes
  • 920 swimsuits
  • 700 wheelchairs
  • 400 bicycles
  • 250 boats (sailing, canoe/kayak, rowing)

The company also committed to picking up the equipment and luggage of the participating athletes from the Toronto Pearson International Airport and transport to and from the event.

Events such as the 2015 Pan Am Games are about the coming together of different people from different nations in the spirit of friendly competition. But these events can only come to be if there’s a strong, organized, and well planned logistics structure behind it. Ian Troop, chief executive officer of TO2015, had this to say on the matter, “A great logistics team means our athletes, officials, volunteers and staff can perform with ease and confidence when the world is watching in 2015″.

The Pan Am Games will be held between July 10th and 26th, with the Parapan Am Games between August 7th and 15th.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news!

Morai-Logistics-Blog-Nearshoring-vs-Reshoring

In the past, we’ve written about the benefits of near-shoring over off-shoring. However, something we haven’t discussed in much detail is re-shoring.

A recent article on EBN discussed the findings of Cushman & Wakefield’s 2015-2017 North American Industrial Forecast. In the article, writer Jennifer Baljko highlights the differences between the praise reshoring has gotten in the media versus Cushman & Wakefield’s findings and in doing so, asks an important practical question of manufacturing and logistics companies: “Where will you put your factory?”.

Before going any further, it’s important to properly define the terms re-shoring and near-shoring as they are sometimes used interchangeably despite them having very different meanings.

According to a Forbes article on the topic,

Re-shoring refers to manufacturing that was previous done outside of America and has been moved back to America. Near-shoring refers to manufacturing work that has returned closer to America in countries such as Mexico.

Cushman & Wakefield’s findings, as Baljko points out, makes fining quality and affordable space for factories and warehouses one of the biggest challenges for companies who decide to move back home.
“A lack of quality space remains one of the biggest challenges facing manufacturers in the U.S. Emerging technological advances, such as improved measuring/process control, advanced digital technologies and sustainable manufacturing, have made many older facilities functionally obsolete, opening the door for more speculative construction to take place within the next few years,” the report noted.

How Does Near-shoring compare?

Although Cushman & Wakefield’s study advised caution for companies considering re-shoring their manufacturing, their findings did indicate that near-shoring to Mexico might be a more prudent long-term strategy.

“Major drivers of industrial real estate activity continue to reflect the prominent role of distribution and logistics sectors. They include large renovations, like Kuehne+Nagel’s 341,000 sf at O’Donnell Logistics Park, or expansions, like Walmart’s 132,000 sf at Parque Industrial El Convento” they write.

The reason for this is that is because of the competitive land prices the country offers. “Average industrial land costs range from $638.08 psf to $231.85 psf for private industrial parks sites and raw land respectively” they write in their report.

Manufacotring in Mexico also has other advantages that we’ve written about elsewhere, but according to Cushman & Wakefield’s, “Generally, Mexico is increasingly developing a pool of high-skilled workers and rapidly integrating its manufacturing industries with global production lines. Also, in addition to a successful macroeconomic reform agenda, an ambitious investment program by the federal government is expected to bring further improvements to Mexico’s transport and logistics infrastructure” they highlight in their findings. “Given such factors, Mexico’s industrial real estate market is forecast to continue growing and benefiting from increased demand from a diversified range of industries” they conclude.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news!

Morai-Logistics-Blog-Epidemic

Last week, an article in The Verge covered Bill Gates’ statements concerning the lack of preparedness the world saw when it came to the Ebola epidemic that ravaged Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia. What Gates suggests is needed, is for preparations for epidemics be similar to preparations for war, “war games” and all.

“It’s useful to compare our preparations for epidemics with our preparations for war. Defense budgets and investment in new weapons dwarf investments in epidemic preparation. NATO has a mobile unit that is ready to deploy quickly. Although it’s not a perfect system, they do joint exercises where they work out basic logistics like how fuel and food will be provided, what language they will speak, what radio frequencies will be used. When soldiers sign up to serve, they know what the risks are and who will take care of them if they’re injured or killed. Few if any of these things exist for an epidemic response.” the article quotes Gates, who originally wrote this in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Gates isn’t wrong in his assessment.

When You Play the Game of Infectious Diseases…

A research paper written by Thomas K. Dasaklis, Costas P.Pappis, and Nikolaos P. Rachaniotis in the International Journal of Production Economics which looked at epidemics control and logistics operations highlighted the importance of logistics supply in controlling epidemics.

“Logistics operations play a crucial role during the containment effort of an epidemic outbreak as they strengthen the ability of all the parties involved to promptly respond and effectively control the situation,” they wrote. “Even at a long-term level, strategies adopted in commercial supply chains could be also adopted in the case of emergency and/or humanitarian supply chains in an effort to match supply with demand”.

The researchers continue their paper with clear examples of the necessity of a strong logistical network to combat an epidemic,

“The flow of essential medical supplies, transportation activities and demand for medical personnel are some of the logistics-oriented features that depend on the available information regarding disease’s progression. At the same time the management of materials flow during the containment effort necessitates its own stream of information. Highly sophisticated systems in business supply chain and relevant technologies like RFID could also be adopted in the case of epidemics containment”.

This is not say to say that there is a one-to-one comparison to more traditional logistics models, ” Such supply chains have much in common with commercial supply chains but at the same time they pose significant challenges as they operate under uncertain, and many times, chaotic conditions” the researchers clarify.

The paper’s conclusion is similar in some aspects to Gate’s words when it finds that there are “a plethora of gaps and discrepancies in the literature regarding epidemics control and logistics operations”.

As The Verge article, quoting the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention points out, over 25,000 across Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia have been infected with Ebola as of March 15th, and 10,000 people have died.

With the virus still spreading, and 116 new cases confirmed in the week before March 8th according to the World Health Organization, perhaps Gates’ suggestion that the Ebola epidemic (and really epidemics) be treated as serious as war is treated isn’t a bad one.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news!

Morai-Logistics-Blog-Canada-Rail

On the 20th of February, Federal Transport Minister Lisa Raitt revealed The Safe and Accountable Rail Act which proposes amendments to the Canada Transportation Act and Railway Safety Act. The Act, which is a response to the Lac-Mégantic disaster in 2013, will make railways and crude oil shippers responsible for the cost of accidents said Raitt.

Along with other previously introduced rail safety requirements, this new act will introduce the following:

  • Railways moving large volumes of crude oil will now be required to carry insurance of up to $1 billion to cover the costs of a potential accident.
  • Oil companies shipping their product in railway cars, meanwhile, will now face a levy of $1.65 for every tonne of crude shipped roughly 23¢ per barrel.
  • The Act will bring in minimum insurance requirements for railway crude oil shippers using federally regulated railways, from $25 million for carriers of minimally dangerous goods to $1 billion for substantial quantities of them.
  • Two new liability insurance levels — $100 million and $250 million — will be phased in during the two years after the bill receives royal assent. Companies will be required to come up with half that amount in the first year and the full amount the year after that.
  • Companies that ship crude oil will also have to pay a fee per tonne shipped that will go into a $250-million backup fund to cover costs above what their insurance covers if they’re involved in an accident involving crude oil.

Too Much or Too Little?

Although the reaction to the announcement of the Act has been mostly positive by the Canadian press, it hasn’t been without some controversy.

An article in the Financial Post quoted Greg Stringham, of the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers’
vice-president of oilsands and markets, who expressed some concerns.

In today’s price environment, every little bit affects the economics. Crude oil prices have plunged more than 50% since June, causing many producers to cut spending.

Mr. Stringham said about 200,000 barrels of oil were moving by rail in Canada every day at the end of 2014. He continued by saying that oil and gas producers don’t know whether additional costs from the new insurance burden will cause oil-by-rail movements to become more expensive for producers.

Looking at the comments section of the articles covering this story, it’s easy to see that there is also the other side who feel that the newly proposed Act can isn’t being taken far enough. It seems that this sentiment stems from the recent Canadian Pacific Railway strike which ended just before employees would’ve been legislated back to work.

In a Maclean’s article, NDP Labour critic Alexandre Boulerice condemned the government for taking quick action against the workers when it was revealed that that there was a legislation being poised in end the strike. “It will put public safety at risk, since the problem of long hours and fatigue among those conductors will not be resolved,” he said at the time

A Problem With No Clear Solution

The growing number of train derailments has to do with the growing volumes of oil being shipped. This is a trend and problem for both Canada and the U.S. There’ve been different long-term solutions that have been recommended, but for now, let’s hope that the new Safe and Accountable Rail Act shows some promise in curbing this deadly trend.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news!

Although large BRICS nations Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa have accounted for much of the growth and investment in emerging markets, recent years has seen a general slowdown of the respective economies of these countries.

Instead, the non-BRIC countries of ASEAN, GCC, Sub-Saharan Africa and the large, next-tier economies of Indonesia, Nigeria, Bangladesh, Mexico and Pakistan have been the most dynamic, offsetting mixed performance in the BRICS countries that powered emerging markets growth in recent years.

This changing tide in growth economies is reflected in the 2015 Agility Emerging Markets Logistics Index, an annual data-driven ranking of 45 emerging economies accompanied by a separate survey of nearly 1,000 global logistics and supply chain executives.

The Index, ranks emerging markets based on their size, business conditions, infrastructure and other factors that make them attractive for investment by logistics companies, air cargo carriers, shipping lines, freight forwarders and distribution companies.

Infographic: 12 Facts Comparing BRICs and Other Emerging Markets in the Logistics and Supply Chain Industry

Morai-Logistics-Infographic-12-Facts-Comparing-BRIC-in-the-Logistics-Supply-Chain

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news!