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Nominated during OWIT (Organization of Women in International Trade) Toronto’s Annual Awards Ceremony, where Kelli Saunders of Morai Logistics Inc. wins Woman Exporter of the Year.

Toronto, ON (June 16,2016)

On Thursday, June 9th 2016, Kelli Saunders, President of Morai Logistics Inc., an Authorized Agent of Mode Transportation, was the recipient of The Woman Exporter of the Year Award from OWIT-Toronto (Organization of Women in International Trade-Toronto). Nominees had to have at least 50% ownership of a profitable business registered and operating in Ontario for more than 3 years. Nominees also had to have earned their primary income from the business and must have been responsible for its daily operations. A significant portion of her company’s business had to have come from exporting products or services.

The Woman Exporter of the Year Award honors an outstanding woman entrepreneur who, through her exporting endeavors, is advancing women and the image of Canadian business women in the international community.

Network and Cherish Those Around You.

Kelli was presented this award for her company’s work with major fast-moving consumer goods companies as a third-party logistics provider with expertise in cross-border intermodal logistics in the US and Mexico.

Jim Damman, President of Mode Transportation, said:

We are all very excited for Kelli. She is an outstanding businesswoman, and she and her team do a great job of providing the best export solutions to her valued customers. This award is very well deserved. Her hard work in receiving this award is something that makes all of us very proud.

Kelli’s advice to other women is to network and cherish those around them. Surrounding yourself with energetic high achievers will give you the foundation for a strong, career-long network from which to grow.

Shown above is Kelli’s acceptance speech.

ABOUT OWIT TORONTO: OWIT-Toronto (Organization of Women in International Trade) is a non-profit professional organization designed to promote women doing business internationally, by providing networking opportunities, export education and global business contacts. Members include women entrepreneurs, service providers and business women involved in international trade.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news.

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By Lisa Henthorn

Virtually impenetrable not all that long ago, the “glass ceiling” blocking women from executive-level jobs in the logistics and supply chain industry appears to be shattering.
Though few (if any) people in our industry would argue that our historic gender bias has gone away, the outlook for women is considerably brighter these days than it was when Industry Week made this bleak observation a little over two years ago:

Half of the human population is female. More than half of all university students in the United States are female. Around a third of all MBA students, including those concentrating on supply chain studies, are female. And yet, when (we) did a manual count of top supply chain executives in Fortune 500 companies, we found only 22 women among 320 businesses that had a true supply chain function.

22 out of 320? That’s a definitive “F-minus,” but there’s growing evidence that our industry’s grade on gender equality is improving. Among the most significant signs: U.S. Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx appointed Michelle Livingstone to a two-year term on the National Freight Advisory Committee.
Livingstone, by the way, is VP of Transportation for Home Depot. As such, she’s on a growing roster of females who hold top-level logistics posts at high-profile companies. The list also includes:

These executives deserve our applause. And the companies that gave them their respective titles should get a pat on the back, too. Why? If for no other reason, it’s because they decided to break with the “old-boy network” tradition that lingers on in our industry and give leadership roles to the people most qualified to have them. This simply makes good business sense, and in light of our industry’s ominous talent shortage, that’s especially true.

In other words, as we look for answers to the labor shortage, there’s no time like the present to tap the female labor pool.

Lisa Henthorn is a vice president at Eyefreight, a provider of transportation management system technology. Lisa can be reached at l.henthorn@eyefreight.com

About Eye Freight

The Eyefreight SaaS TMS is a Level 5 TMS, providing shippers with a control tower for central coordination and detailed visibility over multi-modal, multi-leg, international logistics. Eyefreight runs proprietary algorithms to manage and monitor the entire logistics process – optimizing inventory allocation and distribution planning, and unlocking traditional bottlenecks within the logistics function.

Globalization has broken through several technological, political, and geographic barriers to supply chain logistics. However, while its been documented that companies that include more women at the top levels of leadership tend to outperform those that don’t, there is still a noticeably large gender gap when it comes to the logistics industry.

Although there has been a great deal of progress in the last few decades in closing the gender gap, this infographic shows that there is still a lot left to do.

Closing the gap for good shouldn’t be thought of as barrier for those of us in logistics, but rather an opportunity. An opportunity for logistics companies, as Shalu Shigram puts it, ‘to maintain a competitive edge by utilizing all human resources and potential capital.”

Top 10 Facts Exploring the Gender Gap Around the World

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That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news!

This past Sunday was International Women’s Day. In tribute to celebrating women globally, we would like to dedicate this week’s post to showcasing the major milestones in recent development for the state of women in the logistics and supply chain industry.

Last year we posted an infographic that the logistics community wholeheartedly enjoyed and we thought we would continue the trend and release an update, this time in the form of an eBook. We have come a long way from the world of logistics notoriously being known as a Gentleman’s Club, but we still have a ways to go when it comes to diversity in logistics (and not just with women).

From education, job options, and position within companies, we take a careful look at contemporary findings and showcase the statistics behind women in the logistics industry for 2015.

Women in Logistics

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That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news!

We hope everyone has had a great holiday and we would like to wish all of our readers a Happy New Year! To kick off the year, we have finished compiling our infographic on the top logistics and supply chain facts from the news that we’ve collected throughout last year. As there is a large number of news items spanning the many large topics in the logistics industry, we decided to create our Top 10 by focusing on categories:

  1. Drones
  2. Same-Day Deliver
  3. Supplier Diversity and Women
  4. Sustainability
  5. RFID
  6. World Bank Institute’s Private Sector Platform
  7. Automation
  8. Online Retail
  9. Truck Driver Shortage
  10. Logistics Slow Growth

Each of these topics have some pretty interesting facts and statistics that may have been missed in the hustle and bustle of fellow logistics professionals and enthusiasts. And while we haven’t covered all of the interesting facts from 2014; we felt that these topics helped changes the face of the logistics and supply chain industry in 2014 and serves a good snippet to review the year.

Top 10 Logistics and Supply Chain Facts of 2014

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That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news!

2015_new_yearIf you were reading Forbes’ website last week, then you would’ve come across an interesting article concerning predicted trends for the logistics industry in 2015. Sarwant Singh, a Senior Partner in Frost & Sullivan lists a total of 15 likely trends to occur in 2015 with common threads between all of them being Information & Communication technology providing new avenues for production, solutions, and business models; and societal trends transforming the corporate, market, and personal landscapes.

The entire article is excellent and is a must read for anyone curious about the opportunities afforded by the evolving logistics industry. For this blog post, I would like to focus on three key trends listed in the article as, in my opinion; are the biggest deviations from the status quo in the logistics industry.

Moving toward Zero Latency

The world will prepare itself for faster processing speeds and faster response times. The next few years will see a move toward zero latency and human unnoticeable delays providing real-time experiences. This will increasingly be embedded into workflows and other processes.

The collapse in latency times in just the last few years has been astounding. The old expectation of same month delivery from traditional post service evolved to same week. This year saw same-day delivery become the standard for e-commerce companies such as Ebay, Amazon and even Google. However, even this hasn’t been quick enough with Amazon’s same-hour delivery service for its Prime members which it revealed last week.

The move toward zero latency is not only a massive drive for innovation in the logistics industry (such as Amazon’s delivery drones and DHL’s massive pledge of investment into creating more efficient supply chain networks in China), but also a key way in how many supply-side companies are marketing themselves to customers.

Transparency is the New Green

Increasingly pervasive analytics and collaborative platforms would make data and processes more transparent than ever before. Governments, corporations, organizations, communities, supply chains and even individuals will be more accountable and liable for policies, decisions and strategies.

Customer interactions with businesses of years past were very binary for the most part. A customer wanted or required a product, and a business provided it wholly formed. Questions such as where it came from, how it came to be weren’t asked and businesses weren’t forthcoming with the answers. The logistics industry was no different as the levels of supplier tiers, volume of oversee transactions, and technological limitations complicated the matter further for many companies in the industry.

The change in philosophy has been swift and pervasive in the last few years as large international companies such as Starbucks, Levi’s, and even McDonald’s and Amazon have embraced more open business models.

Our post last week focused on this trend, but suffice to say, greater transparency in the industry is good all-around as it offers customers more information, accountability, and ultimately better choices.

Women Focused Strategies

As the policymakers debate and implement policies increasing quota for women in boardrooms in 2015, we will see a lot more women focused strategies across companies in different sectors.

The industry of logistics has long been a “Gentleman’s Club”. As outlined in the Morai Logistics Infographic focusing on women in the logistics industry, compared to other industries women still have some room to catch up at all levels in the logistics and supply chain industry.

However, not only have more women been getting into the industry, but women focused strategies overall has been on the rise.

In a past article we wrote about how companies are realizing the benefits of supplier diversity go beyond the “social good.” We are now at an age where companies are starting to find that supplier diversity programs can be fiscally beneficial through ROI, and lead to bridge-building into the untapped force that is women-owned businesses.

All-in-all, 2015 will be an exciting year for the logistics industry.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news!

It is no surprise that many people in the logistics industry have labeled it a “Gentleman’s Club.” As outlined in the Morai Logistics Infographic focusing on women in the logistics industry, compared to other industries women still have some room to catch up at all levels in the logistics and supply chain industry.

For example, 35% of logistics graduates are women. Compared to other business graduates in general (of which there are about 45% female graduates), the logistics industry has the highest percentage of male graduates in the industry. Within the professional sphere, women take up less than 20% of company management position despite two-thirds of professionals believing that women offer a different style of management that is viewed as an advantage for companies.

Eye for Transport’ Lean-In Moment: Women in Logistics

Eye for Transport, or EFT, is a business intelligence and C-level networking initiative for the transport, logistics and supply chain industry. It is an organization that specializes in connecting senior industry executives with their industry peers, and with the crucial information they need to excel in their work. They have an annual Third-Party Logistics (3PL) Summit that the President of Morai Logistics was invited to. Kelli Saunders sat on a panel along with 5 other C-level women in the logistics and supply chain industry to discuss their path that got them to where they are today.

Kelli Saunders, President of Morai Logistics, speaking on her journey to becoming President
Kelli Saunders, President of Morai Logistics, speaking on her journey to becoming President
 
 
The efforts that Eye for Transport has taken in showing initiative to create an awareness about the gender gap for executives in the logistics and supply chain industry is commendable. The women in the Lean In series were both inspiring and an example of how women can be a readily able pool of candidates for all levels of position across the entire logistics and supply chain industry. They are great examples of why we should continue our efforts to introduce the notion that logistics is not just a “Gentleman’s Club.”

To see Eye for Transport’s full breakdown of the Lean In Moment on women in logistics, click here: Part 1, Part 2.

That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news!

Today we have created an infographic to shed light into what supplier diversity is and to highlight some quick facts about how the women-owned and other minority-owned businesses have been progressing in the recent years. We also cover the spending trends with regards to the investment of companies into supplier diversity programs.

The benefits of supplier diversity go beyond the “social good.” We are now at an age where companies are starting to find that supplier diversity programs can be fiscally beneficial. A study from the Hackett Group showed that companies that “focus heavily on supplier diversity” generated a 133% greater ROI when it comes to procurement than the typical business. And this is just the beginning, scroll down to see more facts about supplier diversity.

Supplier Diversity and the Logistics Industry

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That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news!

International Women’s Day happened on the 8th of this month and we thought we would contribute a belated infographic for this week’s blog post. The logistics industry is notoriously known for being a Gentleman’s Club consisting of a primarily male workforce. Though that still exists today, companies have taken steps to balance the gender discrepancy in the workforce and women are slowly starting join logistics and supply chain companies at all levels.

The Status of Women in the Logistics Industry

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That’s it for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news!

Source: WEConnect Canada
Source: WEConnect Canada
On our last blog post, we wrote about the WeConnect Canada’s Opening Doors conference. WeConnect Canada distributes the Women’s Business Enterprise (WBE) certification for majority owned, and controlled women’s businesses. The conference is about how certifications such as the WBE is a great strategy for creating opportunities to provide a competitive edge for bidding on corporate contracts as part of supplier diversity programs.

But what is supplier diverstiy? According to WeConnect Canada:

Supplier diversity is all about building relationships and trust to enable business opportunities between corporations and historically under-utilized groups, like women business owners.

In essence, Supplier Diversity programs were creative to give minorities an opportunity to secure contracts with government agencies, major companies and corporations as qualified small business owners. This has come about a reaction to minority and women owned businesses being classified as under-utilized small business owners in order to promote balance and diversity for participating organizations.

In the United States, the Supplier Diversity program was conceptualized in 1953 along with the establishment of the Small Business Administration. The federal government’s efforts to create opportunities for often underrepresented small businesses was a natural segway into providing those same opportunities for minority groups, such as women-owned businesses.

These days a majority of large companies are indeed looking into how to incorporate minority-owned businesses into their partnership agreement and this is especially the case in the logistics and supply chain industry. The biggest challenge is discovery; large corporations have trouble identifying women-owned businesses. Hence the creation of certifying networking organizations such as WEConnect.

These types of certifications allow large corporation to find these companies and take advantage of the following benefits:

A Ready and Capable Force to be Reckoned With

Women-owned businesses are an untapped force to be reckoned with. There are 6.5 million majority women-owned businesses in the United States, employing 7.1 million people according to the U.S. Bureau of the Census. Large corporations agree that there is a strong business case for investing in women; a recent McKinsey & Company survey results showed that 35% of senior executives reported efforts to empower women in emerging markets led to increased profits with an additional 38% reporting an increase in profits in the future. This is even more emphasized in the world of logistics, a well known gentleman’s club but is slowly changing due to the benefits that partnering with diversity suppliers can provide, which brings us to our next point:

Unique Opportunities from Unique Expertise

Businesses that are primarily female-owned are often noted for their ability to have a unique view of the industry and can offer a fresh take on not just the ideas involved in the process but the along every step along the business process. Traditionally only seen in the service sector, women-owned enterprises are now in many specialized industries such as manufacturing, construction, and other industrial fields. This is evident in the efforts that large corporations like Cisco are taking steps into providing the most sustainable means to empower women through supplier diversity and inclusion.

And that’s all for us this week! If you liked this blog post, why not subscribe to our blog? If you’re interested in what we do as a 3rd party logistics provider, don’t hesitate to check out our services (as expressed above, we are very pro finding you the lowest total cost!). We’re also in the twittersphere, so give us a follow to get the latest logistics and supply chain news! To find out more about WEConnect and getting certified as a Women’s Business Enterprise (WBE), visit their site at www.weconnectcanada.org

BONUS: Check out Inc.com’s Top 10 Women-run Companies!